Mother Love of dLifeTV | Don't Live in Denial With Diabetes

Keeping It Real

Living in Denial...And I'm not talking about the river, I am talking about your diabetes!

Mother LoveYou feel it coming... you may even know it has reared its ugly head. And you just ignore it. You would rather think that if you don't accept it, if you do not claim it, it will not be there. You can try to live in denial.

You have got up too many nights just to go to the bathroom. Your skin is itchy, you're witchy, and every water faucet is your friend. Your mother has it, your grandfather lost his legs from the complications, and you refuse to believe it will happen to you. You want to wish it away, pray it away. You think if you don't address it... it will go away. You know you have it. YOU HAVE DIABETES.

For a better quality of life you will need a team of health care pros. We have to get informed and take a proactive approach. I did not want anyone looking at my gnarly toes. I have my podiatrist looking at my feet to make sure I am well and my gnarly feet are only that, gnarly, and aren't developing ulcers, numbness, or tingling.

You will have to change your eating habits. No more eating at random at any time of the day or night. You will have to learn to cook healthier, wiser, and fresher. Smoking would make it worse now. No more guessing what your blood sugar number is. Your lifestyle affects your life. Your regular life has become your dLife.

Denial is one of the cruelties of diabetes. Once I accepted it, I knew I could make positive changes. I know it doesn't happen overnight, but it's a lifestyle change. Giving up smoking and drinking and ripping and running was not easy. Watching my family die off at early ages was even harder than giving up any vice I had or have. I would do anything to be with my mother and sister. To have them well and to have them accept the idea that this was not "a little sugar" they were dealing with. It was their dLife and they chose to live it their way and die early.

The only thing I can do... I must do... is take care of my health and my life better. To be able to share with you that we are not alone. We do not and must not live in denial of the devastation that diabetes can cause. We must come together, share, learn, and grow to have a better quality of life. We can manage better and live well with diabetes. We do not have to lose limbs, eyesight, or body functions. We can flourish and be strong. Let's accept it, acknowledge it, and even embrace our dLife with love.


Last Modified Date: November 28, 2012

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