Dr. Jen Nash

 

Jen NashJen Nash, DClinPsych: Dr Jen Nash is a Chartered Clinical Psychologist living with diabetes since childhood. Motivated to provide emotional support to individuals struggling with the condition, in 2009 she founded Positive Diabetes, a therapy and education service to address the psychological impact of living with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

Positive Diabetes offers individual therapy, consultation, and educational workshops to individuals with diabetes and training and consultation to healthcare professionals. Positive Diabetes also offers a range of self-help programs which are available online, including the Diabetes Weightloss Breakthrough System.

Dr Jen is a national speaker for diabetes charities and her book Diabetes and Wellbeing (Wiley-Blackwell) is forthcoming in 2013. She is a contributing author to My Sweet Life: Successful Women with Diabetes (PHC Publishing Group, 2011).

Dr Jen is committed to inspiring as many people as possible that having a full and healthy life with diabetes is possible and equipping them with strategies to achieve this. "Dr Jen's Diabetes Diary" is a free newsletter full of practical and psychological advice delivered by email to patients and health professionals in more than 35 countries around the world. If you would like to join the Positive Diabetes network, please visit www.PositiveDiabetes.com.

Read Jen's columns here.

Last Modified Date: March 27, 2013

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