dlife.com - For Your Diabetes Life: Dictionary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

obesity:

a condition in which a greater than normal amount of fat is in the body; more severe than overweight; having a body mass index of 30 or more.

obstetrician (ob-steh-TRIH-shun):

a doctor who treats pregnant women and delivers babies.

OCN:

acronym for Oncology Certified Nurse.

OD:

Doctor of Optometry; optometrist.

OGTT:

see oral glucose tolerance test.

OMD:

acronym for Oriental Medical Doctor.

ONC:

acronym for Orthopaedic Nurse Certified.

OPA-C:

acronym Orthopaedic Physician's Assistant - Certified.

ophthalmologist (AHF-thal-MAH-luh-jist):

a medical doctor who diagnoses and treats all eye diseases and eye disorders. Opthalmologists can also prescribe glasses and contact lenses.

optician (ahp-TI-shun):

a health care professional who dispenses glasses and lenses. An optician also makes and fits contact lenses.

optometrist (ahp-TAH-meh-trist):

a primary eye care provider who prescribes glasses and contact lenses. Optometrists can diagnose and treat certain eye conditions and diseases.

oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT):

a test to diagnose pre-diabetes and diabetes. The oral glucose tolerance test is given by a health care professional after an overnight fast. A blood sample is taken, then the patient drinks a high-glucose beverage. Blood samples are taken at intervals for 2 to 3 hours. Test results are compared with a standard and show how the body uses glucose over time.

oral hypoglycemic (hy-po-gly-SEE-mik) agents:

medicines taken by mouth by people with type 2 diabetes to keep blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible. Classes of oral hypoglycemic agents are alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, D-phenylalanine derivatives, meglitinides, sulfonylureas, and thiazolidinediones.

Orinase:

see tolbutamide.

overweight:

an above-normal body weight; having a body mass index of 25 to 29.9.

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Last Modified Date: July 02, 2013

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by Brenda Bell
As I mentioned in an earlier post, one of the benefits that made it cost-effective for me to go with the real healthcare (HSA) plan rather than the phony (HRA) plan is that my company is now covering "preventative" medicines at $0 copay. The formulary for these, as stated by CVS/Caremark (my pharmacy benefits provider), covers all test strips, lancets, and control solutions. I dutifully get my doctor to write up prescriptions for all of my testing needs, submit...
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