A Cure for Diabetes?

Evaluating these advertised cures with a critical eye.

By Travis Grubbs

travis_grubb_profile_page_90x90May 2008 — Two months ago I wrote about a video that stated that type 2 diabetes could go away, while there was no cure for type 1. This video got me to thinking about the ads for purported cures for type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Those of use with a little (or a lot) of gray hair may remember the television show "Green Acres". One of the characters on the show was Mr. Haney, a colorful, conniving, and opportunistic traveling salesman.

Mr. Haney was always willing to convince you that he had something to sell you. He was known for selling such items as "Egg-Layin' Inducing Machines," College "Diplomers", and a "Gen-u-wine Copper Cow-Coaxer" Milking Machine.

I think Mr. Haney would feel at home with the internet ads we see today regarding crmes, pills, potions, etc., that are supposed to enlarge penis' and breasts (but hopefully not on the same person), cure diabetes, cure baldness, etc. He would probably say something like "Gosh-darnit, I was jest a little before my time." Thankfully, we never took Mr. Haney seriously.

However, there are numerous advertisers that are seriously trying to sell us products, labeled as diabetes cures, all in the name of economic gain and free speech. When I did a Google search for the term "cure for diabetes ads" I received such statements as:

"Discover the Shocking Truth About A Cure for Diabetes Being Suppressed!"

They don't want you to know about 99% Type 2 and 64% Type 1 Success!"

"My Doctor Asked Me How I Cured My Husbands Diabetes!"

"Type II - Overwhelmed With Choices? Normalize in 30 days... Guaranteed."

"Reverse Your Symptoms Naturally. Safe, Effective, Proven, Cure."

As consumers, as well as diabetics (type 1 and type 2), we should be wary of all ads for the treatment of diabetes. The ads promising a cure for diabetes can be addressed by ignoring them, or tell them to crawl back under the rock from which they came by requesting the medium displaying them (website, print media, etc.) to remove these ads. The ads for diabetes treatment should be evaluated with a very critical eye, as well as discussed with your doctor, before investing in them. I have decided to purchase products such as glucose tablets, low carb food items, etc. through my local pharmacy or retailer.

Mr. Haney was a fictional character created for the purpose of entertainment. However, the real life advertisers that use "promotional language" in a very free and liberal manner have been tasked with the goal of taking our money by selling us products advertised under questionable slogans. Here's hoping these products will not cause purchasers physical harm and will be evaluated with a critical eye.

Read more of Travis Grubbs' Turn the Page columns here.

 

Disclaimer
dLife's Viewpoints columnists are not all medical experts, but everyday people living with diabetes and sharing their personal experiences, most often at a set point in time. While their method of diabetes management may work for them, everyone is different. Please consult with your diabetes care team before acting on anything you read here to find out what will work best for you.

 

 

Last Modified Date: June 10, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

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