Diet & Exercise

 

Dietary adjustments, called medical nutrition therapy (or MNT), are the front-line treatment in controlling blood glucose levels. Particularly important are carbohydrate and fat intake. Dietary carbohydrates are the bodys main source of glucose, and eating controlled amounts of carbohydrates in the form of high fiber, low fat, and low glycemic food choices helps even out blood glucose levels throughout the day. Cutting saturated and trans fat intake is also important in the prevention of cardiovascular problems.

Learn more about eating right with type 2 diabetes.

Exercise decreases insulin resistance and lowers blood glucose levels. It also benefits heart health by lowering blood pressure, improving cholesterol levels, and decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. And for those who are overweight or obese, a regular fitness routine is important for reaching weight goals. Finally, a good workout is great for reducing stress and improving your overall sense of well-being.

Keep in mind that some types of exercise can make certain diabetic complications worse. In addition, people with type 2 diabetes must take precautions before, during, and after a workout to avoid hypoglycemia (or blood sugar lows). Always consult with your diabetes care team before embarking on a new fitness program.

Reviewed by Francine Kaufman, M.D., 04/08

Last Modified Date: May 22, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

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328 Views 0 comments
by Brenda Bell
Occasionally my mailbox or follow-the-link browsing will come up with something discussing whether (and if so, when) to ease the restrictions on treatment goals when the patient is elderly, arguing either to favor a higher quality of remaining life (lifestyle choices less limited by chronic illness) or to take into consideration geriatric cognitive decline (aka "senility") and simplify, as much as possible, the regimen. While the goal of medicine is, obviously, not to...