Invokana

Brand Name (Generic Name)

InvokanaTM (canagliflozin)

What is Invokana?

InvokanaTM is the first of its class to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration. It is a type of SGLT-2 inhibitor that slows the glucose recovery process by the kidneys, removing more glucose from the body in the urine.  Increased excretion of glucose through urination leads to lower blood sugar levels.

This drug is for people with type 2 diabetes, and is to be used along with diet and exercise.

Who can take InvokanaTM?

Selected people over 18 years of age with type 2 diabetes.

Who should not take InvokanaTM?

People with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis and people with severe kidney problems or who are on dialysis.

What dosage can I take and how should I take it?

The initial dose is 100 mg, taken once daily by mouth.

How often and when should I take InvokanaTM?

InvokanaTM should be taken once every day as prescribed by a medical professional.

It is usually recommended that InvokanaTM be taken before the first meal of the day. However, your doctor will tell you exactly how much to take and when to take it.

What are possible side effects?

  • Possible side effects include dehydration, vaginal and penile yeast infections, urinary tract infections, changes in frequency of urination, hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the system), impairment of kidney function, low blood pressure, and increases in LDL cholesterol.
  • Increased loss of water and sodium from the medication can cause dehydration.  If you feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, see your medical professional.  Risk of dehydration may be further increased if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure, are on a low sodium diet, have kidney issues, or are 65 years of age or older.
  • There are risks involved with urination of increased levels of glucose.  Urinary tract infections can result from urine with high sugar concentration.  Women who take this drug may get vaginal yeast infections and men may get a yeast infection of the skin around the penis. Talk to your doctor about what to do if you have symptoms of a yeast infection. Your doctor may suggest an over-the-counter antifungal medicine. Talk to your doctor right away if you use an over-the-counter antifungal medication and your symptoms do not go away.
  • Taking this drug with other diabetes medications can increase your risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).  If you experience symptoms including, headache, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, confusion, irritability, hunger, rapid heartbeat, sweating, you may be experiencing low blood sugar.

Are other diabetes medications used with it?

Invokana can be used in combination with other medicines. You are encouraged to consult with your doctor or pharmacist to learn about the interactions between Invokana and medications you are taking.

What should I tell my doctor before taking Invokana?

Tell your doctor about any other medications you are on, as well as general allergies and allergies you have to the ingredients of Invokana. Also, tell your doctor if you have diabetic ketoacidosis.

For more information visit: http://www.invokana.com.

Download the Invokana medication guide.

Reviewed by James A. Bennett 04/14.

Last Modified Date: July 07, 2014

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.
Sources
  1. Pharmacist's Letter. MedGuide. http://pharmacistsletter.therapeuticresearch.com/home.aspx?tab=5#tab (Accessed 4/30/13)

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