Combination Oral Medicines

 

Brand Name (Generic Name)

Actoplus Met (pioglitazone metformin)
Warning: pioglitazone, which is a component of Actoplus Met, may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in some patients after using Actos for more than one year. For more information on side effects, refer to the pioglitazone and metformin sections.

Avandamet (rosiglitazone maleate metformin hydrochloride)
Warning: rosiglitazone, which is a component of Avandamet, can cause or worsen congestive heart failure in some patients. Due to the side effects, Avandamet is now only available to patients who enroll in a special program. Talk to your doctor to get more information on the program. For more information on side effects, refer to the rosiglitazone and metformin sections.

Avandaryl (rosiglitazone glimepiride
A combination of rosiglitazone maleate and glimepiride approved for use in the management of type 2 diabetes. For more information, refer to the rosiglitazone and sulfonylureas sections.

Duetact (pioglitazone glimepiride)
A combination of glimepiride and pioglitazone, two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. For more information, refer to the pioglitazone and sulfonylureas sections.

Glucovance (glyburide metformin hydrochloride)
A combination of glyburide and metformin hydrochloride approved for use in the management of type 2 diabetes in conjunction with diet and exercise. For more information on side effects, refer to the glyburide and metformin sections.

Janumet (sitagliptin/metformin HCl)
A combination of metformin and sitagliptin that helps control blood sugar levels. For more information on side effects, see DPP-IV Inhibitors and biguanides.

Janumet XR (sitagliptin (Januvia) and metformin hydrochloride (HCl) extended-release) is a once-daily oral medication. For more information on side effects, see DPP-IV Inhibitors and biguanides.

Jentadueto (linagliptin/metformin hydrochloride) is a twice-daily oral medication.
For more information on side effects, see DPP-IV Inhibitors and biguanides.

Juvisync (sitagliptin and simvastatin)
A combination of simvastatin and sitagliptin that reduces levels of "bad" cholesterol while increasing levels of "good" cholesterol. For more information on side effects, see DPP-IV Inhibitors and Simvastatin.

Kazano (alogliptin/metformin)
A combination of alogliptin and metformin that helps control blood sugar levels. For more information, refer to the DPP-IV Inhibitors and metformin sections.

Kombiglyze XR (saxagliptin/metformin)
Once-a-day metformin extended-release (XR) plus saxagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor combination tablet. For more information, see DPP-IV Inhibitors and biguanides.

Metaglip (glipizide metformin)
A prescription medicine that is used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. For more information, refer to the sulfonylureas and metformin sections.

Oseni (alogliptin/pioglitazone)
A combination of alogliptin and pioglitazone that is used to treat type 2 diabetes. For more information, refer to the DPP-IV Inhibitors and pioglitazone sections.

PrandiMet (repaglinide metformin HCl tablets)
A meglitinides and biguanides combination drug approved for use as an adjunct to diet and exercise in type 2 diabetes patients when response to repaglinide or metformin monotherapy is inadequate. For more information, refer to the meglitinide and biguanides sections. 

Download the ActoplusMetXR medication guide.

Download the Avandamet medication guide.

Download the Avandaryl medication guide.

Download the Duetact medication guide.

Download the Janumet medication guide.

Download the JanumetXR medication guide.

Download the Jentadueto medication guide.

Download the Juvisync medication guide.

Download the Kazano medication guide.

Download the KombiglyzeXR medication guide.

Download the Oseni medication guide.

Reviewed by James A. Bennett 5/13

Last Modified Date: July 07, 2014

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

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by Brenda Bell
As I mentioned in an earlier post, one of the benefits that made it cost-effective for me to go with the real healthcare (HSA) plan rather than the phony (HRA) plan is that my company is now covering "preventative" medicines at $0 copay. The formulary for these, as stated by CVS/Caremark (my pharmacy benefits provider), covers all test strips, lancets, and control solutions. I dutifully get my doctor to write up prescriptions for all of my testing needs, submit...
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