Glyset

What is Glyset?

Glyset is an oral medication used along with a proper diet and exercise to control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes). Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems.

Who can take it? Who can't?

Adults with type 2 diabetes can take Glyset with their doctor's approval and supervision. Those with diabetic ketoacidosis, intestine/bowel problems, or a history of kidney disease should avoid Glyset, or consult their doctor to learn more.

What dosage can I take and how should I take it?

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. Glyset is taken by mouth, usually 3 times daily with the first bite of a meal, or as directed by your doctor.

How often should I take Glyset?

Three times a day. Your doctor might ask you to take the medicine less often at first.

When should I take Glyset?

With the first bite of a meal.

What are the possible side effects?

Side effects include diarrhea, gas, upset stomach, or stomach pain during the first few weeks of treatment.

What should I tell my doctor before taking Glyset?

Tell your doctor if you are taking activated charcoal, or drugs that help digestion. Also, tell your doctor of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may be using, especially pramlintide.

Compiled by Joe Guarneri, dLife contributing writer.

Last Modified Date: November 20, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.
Sources
  1. Webmd, Glyset. http://www.webmd.com/drugs/drug-16866-Glyset+Oral.aspx?drugid=16866&drugname=Glyset+Oral. (Accessed 7/17/13).

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by Nicole Purcell
I had a bad one last night. A scary low bloodsugar that reminded me just how tenuous diabetes makes my existence. I hate those. I hate the feeling that I'm anything less than a strong, capable woman. Diabetes, like a sledge hammer to the knees, has a way of hobbling the confidence I have in my health, strength and well-being. It is both frustrating and disheartening. It's 2:00 am and a good friend called from their third shift job because they needed someone. Just...