Learn about the heat index

Tip A recent Mayo Clinic survey revealed that most people with diabetes don't realize how dangerous hot weather can be. In addition to complicating blood sugar control, hot weather brings with it the risks of dehydration, sunburn, heat stroke, and damaged oral medications and insulin. Only half of the patients surveyed knew the definition of the heat index--the combination of air temperature and humidity. High humidity makes heat more dangerous because it slows the evaporation of perspiration, the way the body cools itself. Add to this the fact that people with diabetes have an impaired ability to perspire and cool the body, and you've got dangerous conditions indeed. High temperatures need not be extreme to be dangerous. "

Reviewed by Jason C. Baker, MD. 01/12.

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by Lindsey Guerin
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