Cruising with Diabetes

Tip 107There are a growing number of cruise packages designed for people with diabetes. Talk to you travel agent about what is available and then remember a few tips to make your trip a memorable one:

  • Don't assume your food will arrive on time. It is better to take your rapid-acting or short-acting medication only when the food arrives.
  • Use the infirmary. If your room does not have a refrigerator, your insulin can be stored in the infirmary. Be sure to introduce yourself to medical staff upon boarding the ship, inform them that you have diabetes and give them written instructions regarding your medications and your needs.
  • Plan your day trips like any other trip. Take a set of all your medical supplies, your doctor's letter, candy or glucose tablets, snacks, and a bottle of water. Then be sure to leave plenty of time to return to the ship at the end of the excursion.
  • Take care of your feet. Always wear comfortable shoes and socks. If you'll be doing a lot of walking, an extra pair of socks to change into is a good idea.

Reviewed by Francine Kaufman, MD. 4/08

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by Lindsey Guerin
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