Valentine's Day

If February brings visions of red foil hearts, chocolate kisses, and other sweet temptations dancing in your head, don't despair. There are plenty of ways for children and adults to celebrate Valentine's Day while keeping their diabetes under control.

valentines Day

For Adults:

Splurge smart. If you must indulge, some confectioners offer low-carb versions of Valentine's classics, which may allow you to savor some sweets with less of an impact on your blood sugar levels. Remember, however, that moderation is still key; low-carb sweets (and those labeled "sugar-free") aren't freebies - they still contain calories and also impact everyone's blood glucose differently.

Celebrate the old-fashioned way. Skip the sweets and go straight to the romance. Bring her (or him) flowers, plan a special evening with love in mind, and concentrate on enjoying each other. Tell your spouse or significant other you'd rather get something spicy than sweet this Valentine's day.

Listen to your heart. In addition to being a time for lovers, February is also American Heart Month. Show your Valentine you care by being aware of your heart disease risk and practicing healthy habits to help ensure you're together into your twilight years.

For Kids:

Cut the candy. Think about what your child really loves - the beach, horseback riding, an amusement park - and make it a Valentine's gift they'll remember. If their heart's desire isn't in season, give them a heart-shaped IOU for the spring or summer.

In the classroom. Instead of buying chocolate kisses for your child to hand out with their Valentine cards, offer stickers, heart-shaped erasers, or another Valentine-themed goodies.

Sugar switcheroo. If your child gets sweets from friends or classmates, stash the candy hearts away for treating blood sugar lows, or use them for decorating a Valentine's Day gingerbread house. Because of its high fat content, chocolate isn't appropriate for treating hypoglycemia, but you can put the treats in the pantry and allow your child to enjoy them occasionally, in moderation, as part of a balanced meal plan.

Visit the dLife Community Forum to talk with others about Valentine's Day, diabetes, and more! Looking for a special gift? Check out our diabetes gift guide for ideas to get something a little different.

Reviewed by Francine Kaufman, MD. 4/08

Last Modified Date: February 14, 2014

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

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by Lindsey Guerin
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