My Most Significant Diabetes Moment

Taking a look back at the year 2011.

travis_grubb_profile_page_90x90By Travis Grubbs

January 2012 — It happens every year, right after Thanksgiving. My sweet and adorable editor cracks her whip and bellows, "Alright you maggots, I want your year in review and I want it now!" Actually, that's not true. She sends out a sweet email saying, "OK boys and girls, it's time to submit your year in review," and then (in the style of Mr. Rogers) she asks us to be her neighbors, and promises to take us out for diabetes-friendly treats, like dark chocolate squares.

Which is why I don't want to piss her off, so I crack the whip on myself and begin wrestling with the process of coming up with something really impressive. So, without further delay I present my most significant diabetes moment from the year 2011!

It occurred on Sunday, October 9, 2011 at 2:44 pm. I was riding my mountain bike on the dirt road behind my house when I got the idea to take a picture of myself with my cell phone. It wasn't for me to be impressed with how I looked as I huffed and puffed through my 18-mile bike ride, but to show some of my inquiring friends my red safety helmet that makes me look so "special."

bikeAs it turned out, I really like this photo. It shows that I have taken control of my diabetes, and in the process I have become a fighter, a survivor, and an all-out bicycle warrior. I even get to wear a helmet (at my wife's insistence)!

Even after I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, I never dreamed that I would one day be riding a bike for exercise.

There were a couple of reasons:

1. I didn't own a bike.
2. Exercise just wasn't my thing.

This photo has also helped me realize that I didn't just take control of my type 2 diabetes, but I grabbed that little rat bastard by the throat and squeezed until its little beady eyes bulged out of its head. Sure, it grimaces, growls, and wriggles loose every now and then. This usually results in some weight gain, my A1C rising, etc. However, I eventually regain my grip and keep it relatively subdued. My results for this year have been pretty good. I have an A1C of 6.0, and my weight hovers around 222 pounds.

I don't kid myself or take my control for granted. Diabetes is not necessarily a silent killer, but it is really good at silently damaging one's eyes, kidneys, appendages, etc., long before the diabetes or damage is detected. As one doctor told me during a nutrition class, "By the time a case of type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, the patient already has some kidney damage."

Controlling diabetes head on helps combat those risks of nerve damage, etc. I know that at best I can only control it, that I will never kill it, and that it may eventually kill me. However, my little rat bastard better be ready for one hell of a fight because I will not bow my head and surrender. Somehow I am comforted to know that at least we will die together. I am fine with that, but I want it on my terms.

So, how did your year go? Let me know, I am in the dLife Community.

Read more of Travis Grubbs' Turn the Page columns here.

 

Disclaimer
dLife's Viewpoints columnists are not all medical experts, but everyday people living with diabetes and sharing their personal experiences, most often at a set point in time. While their method of diabetes management may work for them, everyone is different. Please consult with your diabetes care team before acting on anything you read here to find out what will work best for you.

Last Modified Date: June 07, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

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