About Seniors and Diabetes

 

Other environmental and physical issues that may impact diabetes care for older Americans include:

  • Economic Barriers. Seniors on a fixed income may skimp on appropriate diabetes care, medications, and proper nutrition.
     
  • Transportation. Seniors who can no longer drive may have difficulty getting to medical appointments and keeping up with appropriate diabetes preventative care.
     
  • Mobility. Conditions such as arthritis that are more prevalent with age can keep older adults from regular exercise. By age 75, approximately one in three men and half of all women are physically inactive.
     
  • Isolation. Seniors may lack an adequate peer or family network for emotional and social support. They may be more apt to suffer from depression.

There are solutions. For those who don't have access to public transportation due to location or physical limitations, community-sponsored senior transportation may be available at little to no charge; check with your municipality to find out more. Your local senior center may also provide transportation, as well as meal service.

 

Reviewed by Francine Kaufman, MD. 4/08

Last Modified Date: May 29, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

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by Carey Potash
Some people have trained diabetes alert dogs that bark and lick their face in the middle of the night when their child is experiencing dangerously high or low blood sugars. I don't have a dog to wake me up. When I sleep past the alarm and forget to test my son's blood sugar, I turn to my go-to guy - a hallucinatory stone-faced murderer. Completely zonked hours after I wanted to wake up and check Charlie, I found myself walking along the...