Insulet's Second-Generation Omnipod (Continued)

Primer on human factors – what does this really mean?

The new OmniPod is priced the same as it has always been – $800 for the PDM and $30 per pod. Insulin pumps are typically covered fairly well by insurance, so many patients will not pay nearly this much. If you are currently on another company's insulin pump, Insulet also has a program to get a starter kit at a reduced cost. The new pod is currently shipping to new users.

Current OmniPod users will be upgraded to the new pod for free. Current OmniPod users should start to see the new pods delivered in the next month. Users will be upgraded to the new pod when they reorder supplies.

We think more people will be drawn to pumping and to Insulet's OmniPod now that it is significantly smaller – to date, about 30% of people with type 1 diabetes and less than 1% of people with type 2 diabetes in the US use insulin pumps. We believe with this enhanced technology and smaller size that more and more people will be attracted to physiologic delivery of insulin, which is the closest we can get, as people with diabetes, to "normal"! A big cheer for the dramatic improvement of this product. 

  • Human factors mean how we use and interact with things, especially electronics and medical devices (see examples of human factors from the FDA here). The new OmniPod has a number of additions – most are small, but they certainly add up to a big positive overall.
    • You "confirm" your name when the meter goes on – Kelly liked this feature not so much for the confirmation, but in case it gets lost – if anyone turns it on, they may be able to find her! Also, it's helpful when multiple people are carrying around OmniPod handhelds – you wouldn't want to accidentally give your FWD (friend with diabetes) a three-unit bolus! This is primarily safety-related we think, but it also adds a touch of personalization. You can also pick the background color on the PDM – she chose purple and Adam liked blue. A small thing, but another nice personalization feature.
    • The PDM has several other confirmation screens, which typically ask the user to confirm an entry was correct. For instance, following input of a meal plus a correction bolus, a final screen will display the amount of insulin.
    • The temporary basal menu is particularly well designed, since this can sometimes be confusing. As you increase or decrease the percentage, the screen notes in words "more insulin" or "less insulin" – this makes it crystal clear what a 50% temporary basal rate actually means.
    • During insertion, the PDM screen displays several pictures to ensure safety and warn patients about anything to watch out for. For instance, when removing the plastic cap covering the insertion mechanism, the PDM shows a picture to make sure the insertion needle is not preemptively coming out of the pod. Although we feel like we can insert an OmniPod in our sleep, this is a valuable addition for new users.
    • One hour following insertion, the OmniPod automatically reminds you to check your blood glucose.

The new OmniPod is priced the same as it has always been – $800 for the PDM and $30 per pod. Insulin pumps are typically covered fairly well by insurance, so many patients will not pay nearly this much. If you are currently on another company's insulin pump, Insulet also has a program to get a starter kit at a reduced cost. The new pod is currently shipping to new users.

Current OmniPod users will be upgraded to the new pod for free. Current OmniPod users should start to see the new pods delivered in the next month. Users will be upgraded to the new pod when they reorder supplies.

We think more people will be drawn to pumping and to Insulet's OmniPod now that it is significantly smaller – to date, about 30% of people with type 1 diabetes and less than 1% of people with type 2 diabetes in the US use insulin pumps. We believe with this enhanced technology and smaller size that more and more people will be attracted to physiologic delivery of insulin, which is the closest we can get, as people with diabetes, to "normal"! A big cheer for the dramatic improvement of this product.

This article is published on dLife thanks to diaTribe (www.diaTribe.us), an independent, advertising-free e-newsletter for everyone eager to learn about the latest advances in diabetes management. diaTribe is your inside track on diabetes research and products — sign up here for your complimentary lifetime subscription!

NOTE: This information is not intended to be a replacement or substitute for consultation with a qualified medical professional or for professional advice related to diabetes or another medical condition. Please contact your physician or medical professional with any questions and concerns about your medical condition.

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Last Modified Date: June 19, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

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by Lindsey Guerin
Last Saturday, I’d been struggling with an entire week above 200 that just didn’t seem to want to budge. So I decided that I couldn’t risk the Omnipod anymore and I had to pull it from my management routine, at least until things settled down. I started twice-daily Lantus injections on Saturday night and have been working out the kinks of being back on MDIs since then. The first three days of switching to MDIs were rough. Watching the Lantus take effect slowly was like waiting for...