Insulin Chart

Each insulin has its own unique therapeutic effect. The onset of action of a particular insulin is how long it takes the hormone to start working at lowering blood glucose levels. The insulin peak is the point at which the dose is at the height of its therapeutic effectiveness, and the duration is how long the blood glucose lowering effect of a given insulin lasts from injection to end. Following is a list of insulin types available in the United States, along with their onset, peak, and duration. Talk to your healthcare provider about your insulin regimen.

 

Insulin preparation Onset of action Peak Duration of action
Lispro (Humalog) <15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours
Aspart (Novolog) <15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours
Glulisine (Apidra) <15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours
Regular (Novolin R, Humulin R) 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours 6-10 hours
Humulin R Regular U-500 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours Up to 24 hours
NPH (Novolin N, Humulin N, ReliOn) 2-4 hours 4-8 hours 10-18 hours
Glargine (Lantus) 1-2 hours Usually no peak Up to 24 hours
Detemir (Levemir) 1-2 hours Usually no peak ** Up to 24 hours**
Glargine Injection (Toujeo) 6 hours No true peak 24-36 hours
Afrezza <15 minutes Approx. 50 minutes 2-3 hours
       
Premixed Insulins*** Onset of action Peak Duration of action
Novolin 70/30,
Humulin 70/30
30-60 minutes 2-10 hours 10-18 hours
Humalog 75/25,
Novolog 70/30,
Humalog 50/50
10-30 minutes 1-6 hours 10-14 hours

 

 

Afrezza, a rapid-acting, inhalable form of insulin is now available as well. For more information on Afrezza, click here.

*Information derived from a combination of manufacturer's prescribing information and clinical studies. Individual response to insulin preparations may vary.
**Peak and length of action may depend on size of dose and length of time since initiation of therapy
***Premixed insulins are more variable in peak and duration of action. For instance, even though the literature states that the effects may last for up to 24 hours many people find that they will need to take a dose every 10-12 hours.

Reviewed by James A. Bennett 7/15

Last Modified Date: July 17, 2015

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.
Sources
  1. manufacturers prescribing information; clinical studies; pharmacist references, Facts and Comparisons and Pharmacist's Letter; and AADE reference, The Art and Science of Diabetes Education

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