Chris Rosier Biography

Chris

Claim to Fame: Jockey, Kentucky Derby
DOB: Unknown
Diabetes Type: 1

Chris Rosier began his horse-racing career in 2001. He had his big break as a professional jockey when he rode Summer Bird in the Arkansas Derby, placing third. Known for his ego as a young racer, Rosier experienced difficulty staying disciplined in his early career and briefly fell off the radar in the horse-racing world. Unexpectedly, he suffered a break to his collarbone in 2004, which was shockingly followed by a bout of blindness. Doctors diagnosed him with type 1 diabetes soon after.

Recovering from his health issues, Rosier started a family and became determined to take another shot as a professional jockey. He began working again with Summer Bird, and after several successful races, Rosier got the chance to race with him in the 2009 Kentucky Derby.

To prevent diabetes-related complications from impacting his career again, Rosier maintains a healthy diet and wears an insulin pump during training. He believes that diabetes contributed to his changed perspective on life and drives him to be the best he can be, both as a racer and a person.

Find more athletes with diabetes.

Last Modified Date: May 20, 2013

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Sources
  1. Courier Journal.http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20090423/SPORTS08/904230419/Once-punk-Rosier-readies-Kentucky-Derby (Accessed 5/20/13)
  2. Equestrian Life. http://www.equestrianlife.com/mw/Chris_Rosier (Accessed 5/20/13)

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