Ask Your Pharmacist

Did you know that a pharmacist’s training is intense? Today, pharmacists train for 5-8 years to become the experts they are in medications, earning their Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree in order to become a registered pharmacist. Some in specialize in certain disease states. Next time you pick up your prescriptions, take the time to talk to your pharmacist about your medications. Here are routine questions you can ask:

1.What is this medication for?

2.How should I take this medication? (With/without food, etc.)

3.Are there any precautions I should know about?

4.When should I expect this medication to start working?

5.Are there any possible interactions with my other medications I should be concerned about?

6.What are the side effects of this medication?

7.How should I store it?

8.Is there a generic version? If so, is it ok to use that instead of the brand name?

9.What happens if I miss a dose?

10.Are there refills? How soon can I get a refill?

Reviewed by Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFNC. 8/12

Last Modified Date: November 28, 2012

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.
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