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Rosemary Chicken and Pearl Onions
Source: dLife

Fragrant and tasty, this chicken dish served with pearl onions and tomatoes is sure to become a favorite.

Rating:
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Difficulty: Intermediate

Nutrition Facts

Makes 4 servings
Amount Per Serving
Calories 263.4
Total Carbs 9.5 g
Dietary Fiber 1.4 g
Sugars 0.8 g
Total Fat 9.1 g
Saturated Fat 1.6 g
Unsaturated Fat 1.1 g
Potassium 390.4 mg
Protein 32.3 g
Sodium 578.4 mg
Dietary Exchanges
1 1/2 Fat , 1 1/2 Vegetables , 1/2 Starch , 4 1/2 Lean Meat
See the Detailed Nutritional Analysis
Note: One or more ingredients from this recipe are not included in the nutritional analysis above. Either the ingredient is missing from our database or is listed as "optional" in the recipe.
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Servings
Ingredients

10 oz  frozen white pearl onions
2 tbsp  olive oil
1 each  medium tomatoes
1 each  medium garlic cloves
2 tbsp  white all purpose flour
1 1/2 cup  low fat unsalted chicken broth
0 1/2 tsp  fresh rosemary
0 3/4 tsp  salt
0 1/4 tsp  black pepper
1 pinch  ground nutmeg
1 lb  boneless skinless chicken breasts
Directions
  1. Blanch onions in a pot of boiling water for 1 minute. Drain and place back in pot with cold water for 5 minutes to stop the cooking. Drain again a slip off the skins. Trim away the root and stem with a sharp knife; set aside.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a separate pot over medium heat and add in the tomatoes and garlic. Cook for 2 minutes then sprinkle in the flour and whisk for 1 minute. Slowly add in the broth, whisking as you do to avoid lumps from forming.
  3. Lower heat to low to whisk in the rosemary, salt, pepper, and nutmeg then bring to a boil over high heat, stirring constantly until thickened. Again lower heat to low and add in the onions and the chicken. Simmer until chicken is thoroughly cooked, about 4 minutes. Serve immediately.

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