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Lamb Roast with Lemon-Mustard topping
Source: dLife

Slow-cooked lamb with zingy, spicy flavors.

Rating:
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 8 hours
Difficulty: Intermediate

Nutrition Facts

Makes 8 servings
Amount Per Serving
Calories 385.7
Total Carbs 8.5 g
Dietary Fiber 2.2 g
Sugars 1.8 g
Total Fat 28.0 g
Saturated Fat 11.9 g
Unsaturated Fat 2.2 g
Potassium 298.1 mg
Protein 22.6 g
Sodium 368.4 mg
Dietary Exchanges
4 Fat , 1 Vegetables , 3 1/2 Meat
See the Detailed Nutritional Analysis
Note: One or more ingredients from this recipe are not included in the nutritional analysis above. Either the ingredient is missing from our database or is listed as "optional" in the recipe.
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Servings
Ingredients Directions
  1. Combine in a small bowl the lemon-pepper seasoning and dry mustard. Remove excess fat from meat. Sprinkle mustard mixture evenly over meat and rub it in with your fingers.
  2. Cut meat to fit into a 3 1/2- or 4-quart slow cooker. Coat a large skillet with cooking spray. Cook meat in hot skillet over medium-high heat until brown on all sides. Drain off fat.
  3. Place carrots in cooker; add meat. Combine in a small bowl chicken broth, mustard, lemon peel, lemon juice, rosemary, pepper, and garlic. Pour over meat in cooker.
  4. Cover and cook on low-heat setting for 8 to 10 hours or on high-heat setting for 4 to 5 hours.
  5. If using low-heat setting, turn to high-heat setting. Stir in artichoke hearts. Cover and cook for 30 minutes more.
  6. Remove meat and vegetables to a serving platter, reserving cooking liquid. If present, remove string or netting from meat. Cover meat and vegetables with foil to keep warm.
  7. To make gravy, skim fat from cooking liquid. Combine in a small bowl cornstarch and water. Stir into liquid in cooker. Cover and cook for 15 minutes more or until thickened. Serve meat and vegetables with gravy.

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