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Wild Rice and Potato Latkes
Source: American Institute for Cancer Research

A delicious recipe for your next Hanukkah meal.

Rating:
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 90 minutes
Difficulty: Easy

Nutrition Facts

Makes 4 servings
Amount Per Serving
Calories 131.5
Total Carbs 21.0 g
Dietary Fiber 1.6 g
Sugars 0.8 g
Total Fat 2.7 g
Saturated Fat 0.8 g
Unsaturated Fat 0.4 g
Potassium 100.1 mg
Protein 6.2 g
Sodium 45.0 mg
Dietary Exchanges
, 1/2 Vegetables , 1/2 Meat , 1 1/2 Starch
See the Detailed Nutritional Analysis
Note: One or more ingredients from this recipe are not included in the nutritional analysis above. Either the ingredient is missing from our database or is listed as "optional" in the recipe.
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Servings
Ingredients

0 1/4 cup  Rice, wild, dry
10 oz  russet potatoes
2 each  eggs
2 each  scallions
1 tbsp  white all purpose flour
1 pinch  salt and pepper
4 each  canola cooking spray
Directions
  1. Cook rice in 1 1/2 cups water until completely tender throughout the kernel, about 1 hour or more. Drain rice in colander and let sit until it is dry to the touch, about 15 minutes. Place warm rice in a mixing bowl.
  2. Using paper towels, squeeze as much moisture as possible from potato, a handful at a time and transfer to the bowl with the rice. With a fork, mix in the egg and scallions. Sprinkle with flour and mix in. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Coat a large skillet with cooking spray until well coated. Place over medium-high heat.
  4. Place rounded tablespoons of the mixture in the pan, one at a time, pressing each firmly with the back of a fork to make thin, 2-inch pancakes with lacy edges. Space latkes 2 inches apart. When lightly browned on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes, gently turn latkes and brown on the other side, about 2 minutes. (To avoid splattering oil, use a splatter screen.) When done, transfer to a warm plate and keep warm. Repeat with remaining mixture, re-spraying pan before adding more pancakes. Serve immediately.

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