Preventing Diabetes (Continued)

The miracle cure

Better still, the prescription is not only effective, but it's safe. It has no adverse side effects, no medication interactions. But no one wants to take it. Why? What's the prescription for preventing diabetes? Hold on one sec. Let me grab a prescription pad.

The prescription for preventing diabetes is:

Moderate weight loss. 5-7% of your body weight.
Exercise. 30 minutes a day, five days per week.
And eat smart.

Yeah. No kidding. What doctors have basically been telling patients for years and years and years was scientifically proven to be true. But now it's a proven fact that type 2 diabetes can be prevented, or at least pushed back for decades, why is that we have an exploding epidemic of diabetes in the years since the results of the DPP were published?

Because it's easier to change your gender than your diet. Because most people would rather have their fingernails pulled out than exercise. Because, for most people, it's really, really, really hard to lose weight.

Taking your medicine

I'll tell you what. Why don't you just take 1/3 of the prescription? Because later research has shown that, despite what your mother told you, eating right really doesn't matter. Not at least as far as preventing diabetes is concerned. And while exercise is clinically proven to boost your mood, help your heart, improve your sleep, and more — it really doesn't play much of role in preventing diabetes, either. It's all about the weight.

So how do you lose weight most effectively? What's the easiest way?

There are no pills. No miracle diets. You just have to eat fewer calories than your body needs to get through the day. If you do that, your body will burn some fat reserves to make up for what it's missing and you'll lose weight.

Weight loss in the real world

So how do you go about doing that? What I find works best for most people with prediabetes (and types 2 who want to lose weight) is to simply eat less of what you already eat now.

OK. Sorry if you expected something more brilliant from me. But it works, it's easy and more importantly, it's sustainable. Like anything new, start small. Eat one bite LESS at every meal for a week. Leave it behind.

That's it. It's that simple. I know, we've been trained to clean our plates and all those voices in your head will be crying about the starving children in Africa. But you know what? Making yourself fat will not help the starving children in Africa. If you want to help them, set your fork down and pick up your checkbook.

In the second week, I want you to eat two bites less. Weigh yourself once a week. Once you start losing weight at the rate of a pound or two per week, keep eating whatever number of bites less that it took to get the weight loss going. If you get stuck, it's time to leave behind a third or fourth bite at the end of each meal.

By going slow and steady like this, your stomach will "shrink." You will not be hungry. In fact, once you get to the point where you're eating what you need, not only will you not be hungry, you'll find you have more energy than you've had for years.

And you delay, or perhaps prevent altogether, a visit from the diabetes reaper.

Page: 1 | 2 | 3

Last Modified Date: May 24, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

Sign up for FREE dLife Newsletters

dLife Membership is FREE! Get exclusive access, free recipes, newsletters, savings, and much more! FPO

Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
167 Views 0 comments
by Brenda Bell
Two of the requirements of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act are "accountable care" and "meaningful use". It looks like this is supposed to spread from healthcare providers to health records to individual patients, in some sort of patchwork round-robin mishmosh that makes War and Peace look like a Sesame Street comic book. The way I read it, I can only be accountable for my health and my physical development if I can get...