Sign up for FREE dLife Newsletters

dLife Membership is FREE! Get exclusive access, free recipes, newsletters, savings, and much more! FPO

Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Sponsor Specials
35 Views 0 comments
by Brenda Bell
Under New Jersey's sanitation laws, syringe needles (sharps) need to be treated as hazardous biological waste. Lancets, like the straight pins and needles we use for garment sewing, do not. Still, the potential for secondary damage (to bathroom attendants, cleaning personnel, and sanitation workers) from these small sharps is non-neglible. While there's no "prick-safe" method of disposing of the needles I break sewing an average costume, standard lancets...

More On This Topic

No items are associated with this tag

Related Videos

No items are associated with this tag
Sources
  1. 1 - Centers for Disease Control. National Diabetes Fact Sheet United States, 2011. (PDF accessed 9/19/12).

    2 - The Expert Committee on the Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus. "Follow-Up Report on the Diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus." Diabetes Care 26:3160-3167, 2003.

    Reviewed by Francine Kaufman, M.D., 04/08