Peritoneal Dialysis

 

Treatment Options for Kidney Failure (ESRD)

Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal dialysis (PD) uses the lining of the abdomen (peritoneum) to filter toxins from the bloodstream. A surgically implanted catheter is used to fill the abdominal cavity with dialysate. The peritoneum is similar to a hemodialysis membrane, drawing toxins out of the blood and into the dialysate-filled abdominal cavity. The waste-filled dialysate is then removed from the abdominal cavity after a prescribed period of dwell time. This is known as an exchange. There are several different types of PD:

  • Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD). The patient inserts a catheter into the abdomen and infuses a fresh supply of dialysate. The process is performed several times during the day (usually a four to six hour exchange each time) and once while sleeping through the night.
  • Continuous Cyclic Peritoneal Dialysis (CCPD). A machine, or cycler, performs the dialysate exchange in CCPD. It will perform several cycles during the night, and then one or two daytime exchanges that last the entire day.
  • Intermittent Peritoneal Dialysis (IPD). IPD, sometimes called NIPD (nocturnal intermittent peritoneal dialysis) also uses a cycler to perform six or more exchanges at night. However, unlike CCPD, there is no daytime exchange.

Last Modified Date: May 15, 2013

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by Brenda Bell
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