Peripheral Arterial Disease

 

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) and Limb Loss

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a form of artherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). In PAD, fat builds up inside the artery (blood vessel) walls. Over time, this causes a blockage that can keep your blood from flowing properly. PAD may result in blockages in the brain, arms, kidneys, and legs.

Diabetes is a major cause of PAD. People with diabetes are unable to properly digest the sugar they eat. This sugar builds up and causes changes in their blood vessels. These changes lead to circulation problems. PAD is a risk factor for foot ulcers that can lead to amputation in diabetic patients.

How many people have PAD?

  • As many as 10 million people in the United States have PAD.
  • In 1996, an estimated 128,588 individuals lost a limb because of PAD.

What are the risk factors?

  • Diabetes. People with diabetes are at greater risk for severe PAD. People with diabetes are five times more likely to have an amputation due to PAD.
  • Age. The risk of limb loss due to PAD increases with age. People 65 or older are two to three times more likely to have an amputation.
  • Gender. Men with PAD are twice as likely to undergo an amputation as women.
  • Race/ethnicity. Some racial and ethnic groups have a higher risk of amputation (i.e., African Americans, Latino Americans, and Native Americans). This is because they are at increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

How do I prevent or manage PAD?

To prevent or control the progression of PAD:

Reprinted with permission of the Amputee Coalition of America.

Last Modified Date: July 01, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

More on this Topic

No items are associated with this tag

Sign up for FREE dLife Newsletters

dLife Membership is FREE! Get exclusive access, free recipes, newsletters, savings, and much more! FPO

Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
45 Views 0 comments
by Brenda Bell
Many people say that depression is a side effect or complication of diabetes. Without discounting the association of the psychological condition with the physical one, I'm not convinced that our high and/or unstable glucose levels are directly responsible for that change in our mental state. My belief is that the unrelenting need for self-care, for following the sort of care schedules that can drive licensed, professional caregivers crazy, is what overwhelms us...
  • Watch dLifeTV online now!

    Click here for more info
  • Join the #1 Diabetes Community.

    Join Today!
  • Everything you need to know about Insulin.

    Click here