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The Question
Fri Oct 12 21:37:45 EDT 2012

I am getting 1-2 UTI's per month. The antibiotics and infections are raising BS. Is it common to get UTI's as a result of high BS? Any suggestions?
Asked By: wizard56  
Category: Type 2

Background Info Hide
Have had chronic UTI's since 1976. Diagnosed Type II in 1998, probably 10 years after I should have been. Byetta 10, Metformin 2000, Glipizide 20, gemfibrozil, lisinopril. I have the trifecta - high BS, high cholesterol, and high triglycerides. Last A1C 6.6
Diabetes Profile Hide
n/a
Expert Answers (1)
2012-10-17 20:08:18.0

Hello Wizard
Thank you for bringing your question to dLife. You ask if Frequent Urinary Tract Infections are because of increased glucose levels. Yes, and the catch 22 is that high glucose levels make it very difficult to fight any infection including UTIs. If you are having 1-2 UTIs a month, you are really having the same infection that is not being cleared. You have a HbA1c level of <7% so you are reaching the goal recommended by the American Diabetes Association however you still suffer from these infections.

I suggest that you see a specialist to treat these infections. Both the provider managing your Diabetes and a specialist such as an Urologist need to work together to develop a treatment plan to fight these UTIs. You may need to be on a long low dose treatment of a broad spectrum antibiotic such as Bactrim or Macrodantin along with plenty of hydration and well controlled glucose levels. Try to test your glucose levels throughout the day to see if you are having highs after meals that may be complicating the infection treatment.

Basic infection control such as good hygiene, clean hands, clean cotton underwear and urinating after any sexual activity to flush the ureter is important.

Answered By: Rita Juray
Accreditations: RN, MLT-ASCP, CCM, CDE
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*** All information contained on dLife.com is intended for informational and educational purposes only. Our Expert Q&A is not intended to be a replacement or substitute for consultation with a qualified medical professional or for professional medical advice related to diabetes or another medical condition. Please contact your physician or medical professional with any questions and concerns about your medical condition.

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