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The Question
Tue Jul 09 17:54:23 EDT 2013

Can my doctor put me on a long-acting insulin instead of recomending oral medications?
Asked By: babyd2012  
Category: Type 2

Background Info Hide
type 2 diabetic for 3 years. I was on a personalized diet and exercise plan and it is no longer working I am uncomfotable taking oral medications and have a lot of trouble swollowing pils. I will have to be on insulin eventually anyways so I feel like it makes since to start it now. Id rather prevent diabetes comlications before they happen. I go to my primary care physician in 2 weeks. How should I tell my doctor that I would like to be on some kind of insulin therapy?
Diabetes Profile Hide
n/a
Expert Answers (2)
2014-05-08 12:46:08.0

Dear babyd2012, Thank you for writing into dlife with your question regarding the use of a long-acting insulin instead of using oral medications. I can certainly understand why your physician is recommending oral medications. Oral medications are the first-line treatment for medications used for type 2 diabetes. They are inexpensive and relatively safe. There are medications that stimulate your pancreas to make more insulin. They are medications that help you use your own insulin more effectively. These classes are inexpensive. Some medications are small pills, others we refer to as a "horse pill". Obviously, if you have trouble swallowing a large pill, Glucophage is probably not the drug of choice. You could be put on a small amount of a long-acting insulin. Be sure that your health insurance will pay for it, as this type of insulin is fairly expensive. You will find that you have some variation in blood sugars throughout the day if you are only taking a small dose of long-lasting insulin. You and your physician need to set some glucose goals and make sure that whatever medication you take keeps you within those targets.
Answered By: Janice Fisher
Accreditations: RD, LD, PHD, CDE, BC-ADM
Sources Show
2014-05-08 12:46:00.0

Dear babyd2012, Thank you for writing into dlife with your question regarding the use of a long-acting insulin instead of using oral medications. I can certainly understand why your physician is recommending oral medications. Oral medications are the first-line treatment for medications used for type 2 diabetes. They are inexpensive and relatively safe. There are medications that stimulate your pancreas to make more insulin. They are medications that help you use your own insulin more effectively. These classes are inexpensive. Some medications are small pills, others we refer to as a "horse pill". Obviously, if you have trouble swallowing a large pill, Glucophage is probably not the drug of choice. You could be put on a small amount of a long-acting insulin. Be sure that your health insurance will pay for it, as this type of insulin is fairly expensive. You will find that you have some variation in blood sugars throughout the day if you are only taking a small dose of long-lasting insulin. You and your physician need to set some glucose goals and make sure that whatever medication you take keeps you within those targets.
Answered By: Janice Fisher
Accreditations: RD, LD, PHD, CDE, BC-ADM
Sources Show

Community Answers (0)
 

*** All information contained on dLife.com is intended for informational and educational purposes only. Our Expert Q&A is not intended to be a replacement or substitute for consultation with a qualified medical professional or for professional medical advice related to diabetes or another medical condition. Please contact your physician or medical professional with any questions and concerns about your medical condition.

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