Search
Diabetes News

Archive - 10 - 2009

Women with Chronic Kidney Disease More Likely than Men to Go Undiagnosed

Posted by dlife on Sat, Oct 31, 09, 10:36 AM 0 Comment

October 31, 2009 (Newswise) - Woman are at particular risk of their primary care physicians delaying diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a paper being presented at the American Society of Nephrologys 42nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in San Diego, California. The findings suggest that educating practitioners about CKD could increase the timely diagnosis of CKD, thereby leading to improvements in care to patients and savings in Medicare dollars.Maya Rao, MD, of Columbia University, reviewed records from nearly 900 patients at 18 rural, community-based primary care clinics in Oregon, to investigate whether primary care physicians accurately diagnosed CKD in patients with known kidney dysfunction. Chronic kidney disease is estimated to affect up to 19 million adults in the U.S. and is usually diagnosed and treated in the primary care setting. The analysis showed that 52.4 percent of patients found to have CKD did not have a diagnosis in their charts. Females were more likely to be undiagnosed than males, except at the most advanced stages of CKD.Chronic kidney disease is very prevalent, uses a great deal of Medicare dollars and needs to be detected early in order to begin an effective treatment plan. Without early diagnosis and treatment, the patient may be more likely to need dialysis and suffer related consequences, such as heart disease, said Dr. Rao. This study shows that CKD is still being missed by primary care physicians, especially among women patients, and that more education is needed to ultimately improve early detection and diagnosis.To measure kidney function, primary care doctors typically order a blood test called creatinine, but Dr. Rao says this alone is not a particularly accurate measure of kidney function. The serum creatinine should also be plugged into a formula that gives an estimated kidney filtration rate (called glomerular filtration rate, or eGFR) which is a much more accurate estimate of kidney function. Women have a lower eGFR than men for the same level of serum creatinine. Thus, the same serum creatinine level that initially appears normal for both a man and a woman can translate into depressed kidney function for the woman, making her at higher risk for undetected kidney disease. In the study, lab reports that automatically included the eGFR calculation did not show a gender disparity in diagnosis of patients suggesting that including this value on all serum creatinine lab reports could improve diagnosis of CKD in women.Study co-authors include Sharon Anderson, MD, FASN and Cynthia Morris, PhD, MPH, both of Oregon Health and Science University. The authors report no financial disclosures. Dr. Anderson is President-Elect of the American Society of Nephrology.

Help Your Kidneys: Pass on Salt and Diet Soda

Posted by dlife on Sat, Oct 31, 09, 10:34 AM 0 Comment

October 31, 2009 (Newswise) - Individuals who consume a diet high in sodium or artificially sweetened drinks are more likely to experience a decline in kidney function, according to two papers being presented at the American Society of Nephrologys annual meeting in San Diego, California.

Julie Lin MD, MPH, FASN and Gary Curhan, MD, ScD, FASN of Brigham and Women's Hospital studied more than 3,000 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study to identify the impact of sodium and sweetened drinks on kidney function.There are currently limited data on the role of diet in kidney disease, said Dr. Lin. While more study is needed, our research suggests that higher sodium and artificially sweetened soda intake are associated with greater rate of decline in kidney function.The first study, Associations of Diet with Kidney Function Decline, examined the influence of individual dietary nutrients on kidney function decline over 11 years in more than 3,000 women participants of the Nurses Health Study. The authors found that in women with well-preserved kidney function, higher dietary sodium intake was associated with greater kidney function decline, which is consistent with experimental animal data that high sodium intake promotes progressive kidney decline.The second study, also conducted by Dr. Lin and Dr. Curhan, Associations of Sweetened Beverages with Kidney Function Decline, examined the influence of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages on kidney function decline in the same group of Nurses Health Study participants. An analysis of the nationally representative NHANES III participants had previously reported an association between sugar-sweetened soda and urinary protein, but data on kidney function change was not available. This investigation reported a significant two-fold increased odds, between two or more servings per day of artificially sweetened soda and faster kidney function decline; no relation between sugar-sweetened beverages and kidney function decline was noted said Dr. Lin. This association persisted even after the study authors accounted for age, caloric intake, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, cigarette smoking, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms for kidney decline in the setting of high intake of artificial sweetenters have not been previously studied and deserve further investigation.The study participants were older Caucasian women and the authors note that the findings may not be directly applicable to men or people of other ethnicities.The authors report no financial disclosures.

Sign up for FREE dLife Newsletters

dLife Membership is FREE! Get exclusive access, free recipes, newsletters, savings, and much more! FPO

Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Sponsor Specials

dLife Weekly Poll

Do you know your cholesterol numbers?