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Diabetes News

Archive - 03 - 2012

Glycemic Index Foods at Breakfast Can Control Blood Sugar Throughout the Day

Posted by dlife on Fri, Mar 30, 12, 11:28 AM 0 Comment

March 30, 2012 (Newswise) Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar throughout the morning and after the next meal of the day, researchers said at the Institute of Food Technologists Wellness 12 meeting.These breakfast foods also can increase feelings of satiety and fullness and may make people less likely to overeat throughout the day, acdcording to presentations Wednesday by Kantha Shelke, Ph.D., principal, Corvus Blue LLC, and Richard Mattes, M.P.H., R.D., distinguished professor of foods and nutrition at Purdue University.The glycemic index ranks foods on the extent to which they raise blood sugar levels after eating. Foods with a high index are rapidly digested and result in high fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Foods with a low glycemic index produce gradual rises in blood sugar and insulin levels and are considered healthier, especially for people with diabetes.Mattes research specifically focused on the advantages of having almonds, a low glycemic index food, with the morning meal. In his study, published last year in the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, participants who ate a breakfast containing whole almonds experienced longer feelings of fullness and had lower blood glucose concentrations after breakfast and lunch, compared to those who did not have a low-glycemic breakfast.When a low glycemic food is added to the diet, people spontaneously choose to eat less at other times throughout the day. Mattes added that while the calories need to be taken into consideration as part of a persons overall diet, almonds can be incorporated in moderate amounts without an effect on body weight.Both Mattes and Shelke stressed the importance of eating a healthy, low-glycemic breakfast in maintaining a healthy weight and blood sugar levels. A 2009 study found that about 30 percent of people skip breakfast one to three times per week. Among those who eat breakfast, cold cereal is the most popular (83 percent), followed by eggs (71 percent). In addition to low glycemic index, Dr. Shelke said the ideal breakfast for consumers has these attributes:
Savory
Portable
Pleasing texture
Fills you up for extended periods of time
Satiates quickly so less is consumed
Affordable for the whole family to eat every day
Non-fried
Delicious without making you feeling guiltyThis is a very tall order for food product manufacturers, Shelke said. It takes a lot of skill and understanding.While it may present challenges for food manufacturers, it is well worth it to develop these products because of the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States and beyond. It is estimated that by 2030, more than 16 percent of the global population will have a blood sugar problem.Most of the risk factors are things that can be managed and modified, Shelke said. We can reverse pre-diabetes and prevent it from becoming diabetes. Food has become the reason for whats ailing us, but it can actually be a solution in a number of different ways.About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a nonprofit scientific society. Our individual members are professionals engaged in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT's mission is to advance the science of food, and our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply, contributing to healthier people everywhere.For more than 70 years, the IFT has been unlocking the potential of the food science community by creating a dynamic global forum where members from more than 100 countries can share, learn, and grow. We champion the use of sound science across the food value chain through the exchange of knowledge, by providing education, and by furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, D.C. For more information, please visit ift.org.

Overweight Baby Girls at Increased Risk for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes in Adulthood

Posted by dlife on Thu, Mar 29, 12, 11:09 AM 0 Comment

March 27, 2012 (Newswise) New study shows birth weight may identify future metabolic risk in girls.Heavier female babies are more likely to develop diabetes and related metabolic risks when they grow up compared with their male counterparts, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Societys Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM).The incidence of early onset type 2 diabetes has been rising in stride with the epidemic of childhood obesity. Previous studies have shown that cardiovascular risk factors in childhood and adults are associated with birth weight. This study investigated the associations between birth weight and body fat distribution in early childhood with future metabolic risk factors such as obesity, insulin resistance and high blood pressure.What happens to a baby in the womb affects future heart disease and diabetes risk when the child grows up, said Rae-Chi Huang, MD, PhD, of The University of Western Australia in Perth and the studys lead author. We found that female babies are particularly prone to this increased risk and females who are at high risk of obesity and diabetes-related conditions at age 17 are showing increased obesity as early as 12 months of age.In this study, researchers examined 1,053 17-year-olds from an Australian birth cohort. Follow-up of study participants took place at eight intervals between one and 17 years of age. In addition to birth weight and BMI, researchers took measurements of blood pressure and levels of insulin, blood glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. The 17 year old girls with the greater waist circumference, triglycerides, insulin, and lower HDL-cholesterol (good cholesterol) were also heavier from birth with consistently higher BMI thereafter. In contrast, birth weight had no statistical impact on metabolic risk factors in males.These findings are significant because in our modern western society, we are seeing increased maternal obesity and gestational diabetes, which means there will also be a rise in female newborns that are born large for their age, said Huang. Our results can be applied to public health messages targeting both maternal health and measures in early infancy regarding the prevention of childhood obesity and its consequences.Other researchers working on the study include: Trevor Mori, Sally Burrows, Chi Le Ha, Wendy Oddy, Carly Herbison, and Lawrence Beilin of The University of Western Australia; and Beth Hands of Notre Dame University in Western Australia.The article, Sex Dimorphism in the Relation between Early Adiposty and Cardio-Metabolic Risk in Adolescents, appears in the June 2012 issue of JCEM.Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the worlds oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Societys membership consists of over 15,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site atwww.endo-society.org. Follow us on Twitter athttps://twitter.com/#!/EndoMedia.

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