Search
Diabetes News

Archive - 01 - 2013

Binge Drinking Increases Risk of Type 2 Diabetes by Causing Insulin Resistance

Posted by dlife on Thu, Jan 31, 13, 03:12 PM 0 Comment

January 31, 2013 (Newswise) —  Binge drinking causes insulin resistance, which increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to the results of an animal study led by researchers at the Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The authors further discovered that alcohol disrupts insulin-receptor signaling by causing inflammation in the hypothalamus area of the brain. The results are published in the January 30 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine. "Insulin resistance has emerged as a key metabolic defect leading to Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD)," said Christoph Buettner, MD, PhD, senior author of the study and Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease). "Someone who regularly binge drinks even once a week, over many years, may remain in an insulin resistant state for an extended period of time, potentially years," said Dr. Buettner. In this study, researchers treated rats with alcohol for three consecutive days to simulate human binge drinking. A control group received the same amount of calories. Once alcohol was no longer detectable in blood, glucose metabolism was studied through either glucose-tolerance tests or through controlled-insulin infusions. The rats treated with alcohol were found to have higher concentrations of plasma insulin than the control group, suggesting that insulin resistance may have been the cause of the impaired glucose tolerance. High plasma insulin levels are a major component of the metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the risk for Type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and stroke. "Previously it was unclear whether binge drinking was associated with an increased risk for diabetes, since a person who binge drinks may also tend to binge eat, or at least eat too much. Our data show for the first time that binge drinking induces insulin resistance directly and can occur independent of differences in caloric intake," said Claudia Lindtner, MD, first author of the study and an Associate Researcher of Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine. About The Mount Sinai Medical Center The Mount Sinai Medical Center encompasses both The Mount Sinai Hospital and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Established in 1968, the Icahn School of Medicine is one of the leading medical schools in the United States, and is noted for innovation in education, biomedical research, clinical care delivery, and local and global community service. It has more than 3,400 faculty in 32 departments and 14 research institutes, and ranks among the top 20 medical schools both in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding and by U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital, founded in 1852, is a 1,171-bed tertiary- and quaternary-care teaching facility and one of the nation's oldest, largest and most-respected voluntary hospitals. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked The Mount Sinai Hospital 14th on its elite Honor Roll of the nation's top hospitals based on reputation, safety, and other patient-care factors. Mount Sinai is one of 12 integrated academic medical centers whose medical school ranks among the top 20 in NIH funding and by U.S. News & World Report and whose hospital is on the U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll. Nearly 60,000 people were treated at Mount Sinai as inpatients last year, and approximately 560,000 outpatient visits took place.

Want to Lose Weight? Take a Bite and Wait

Posted by dlife on Thu, Jan 31, 13, 12:41 PM 0 Comment

January 30, 2013 (Newswise) — If you're giving in to cravings for chocolate or other snacks, think smaller, take a bite and wait: A new study by Cornell University researchers finds that eating smaller portions of commonly craved foods will satisfy a person just as well as a larger portion. "This research supports the notion that eating for pleasure – hedonic hunger – is driven more by the availability of foods instead of the food already eaten," said Brian Wansink, professor of economics and a co-author of the study, "Just a bit satisfies, not magnifies, hunger and craving tendencies for snacks." Wansink wrote the study with lead author Ellen van Kleef of Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and co-author Mitsuru Shimizu, Cornell post-doctoral researcher. The research will be published in the January issue of the journal "Food, Quality and Preference." The study found that, as expected, portion size has a direct impact on calorie intake – but it also discovered that portion size did not have a direct impact on the level of satisfaction of the person eating the snack. Researchers came to these conclusions after testing 104 adults, who were given large and small portions of the same snack. Those who ate large portions consumed 77 percent more calories than those who ate small portions. Yet, despite consuming substantially more calories, hunger pangs of people eating large portions decreased by the same amount as those eating small portions. In both conditions, craving tendencies were significantly decreased 15 minutes after eating. "So, how much chocolate would you need to eat to be satisfied? Less than half as much as you think," Wansink said. "If you want to control your weight, here's the secret: Take a bite and wait. After 15 minutes all you'll remember – in your head and in your stomach – is that you had a tasty snack."

Sign up for FREE dLife Newsletters

dLife Membership is FREE! Get exclusive access, free recipes, newsletters, savings, and much more! FPO

Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Sponsor Specials

dLife Weekly Poll

If you, like blogger Nicole Purcell, were to think about life without diabetes, would there be anything you would miss?