Nutrition in Every Hue

 

Nutrition ChartFrom: The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes by Bob Greene; John J. Merendino Jr., M.D.; and Janis Jibrin, M.S., R.D. Copyright © 2009 by Bestlife Corporation. Reprinted by permission of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

A fruit's or vegetable's color is a good indicator of the different vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients it contains. Put a rainbow on your plate, and you're going to cover a lot of your nutrient bases. Here's a color-by-color breakdown.

 

Fruit/Vegetable Color or Type

Such as...What they bring to the table

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asparagus, beet greens, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, dandelion greens, green beans, honeydew melon, kale, kiwi, mustard greens, okra, parsley, peas, peppers, spinach, Swiss chard, romaine lettuce, and zucchini      


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lutein and zeaxanthin, powerful antioxidants (especially lutein) linked to reducing the risk for two eye diseases: cataracts and macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness. Many are also good sources of beta-carotene.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White/Green


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artichokes, asparagus, celery, chives, endive, garlic, green pears, mushrooms, onions, and scallions


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onions, potatoes, and garlic are especially rich in allyl sulfides, which help prevent stomach and colon cancer and may lower cholesterol. Onions are also a good source of quercetin, which protects against cancer and possibly heart disease. The rest contain flavonoids, a large class of phytonutrients linked to preventing heart disease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEXT: What About Carrots?

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Last Modified Date: June 03, 2014

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