Healthy Swaps-Sprouted Bread

The ultimate guide to having your cake and eating it too (continued).

Be adventurous, and try something new this week: Buy some sprouted bread. Why? They can be more nutrient-packed and have less impact on blood sugar than regular breads.

Sprouted_BreadsFormerly found only in the refrigerated sections of little health food stores, breads made from sprouted grains are increasing in popularity and availability. Traditional bread is made from grains –– usually, little hard kernels –– that are ground up and made into flour. Sprouted bread is made from grains that have been allowed to sprout before being ground. Once it sprouts, the grain contains a greater array of nutrients, and it may even decrease a bit in carbohydrates and glycemic impact. Jennie Brand-Miller and her colleagues, co-authors of The New Glucose Revolution and What Makes My Blood Glucose Go Up and Down? theorize that when a grain begins to sprout, it is likely that it uses its most readily available carbohydrate to fuel the actual growing of the tiny shoot. The result would be fewer carbohydrates left after sprouting.

Virtually any grain that can be made into flour can be sprouted first, so browse the selection in your natural foods store and start experimenting. You may find you love the crunch of one or the tangy, nutty flavor of another.

Reviewed by Susan Weiner, R.D., M.S., C.D.E., C.D.N. 3/08


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Last Modified Date: June 17, 2013

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by Brenda Bell
Years before I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, The Other Half came out of a doctor's appointment with a diagnosis of "borderline diabetes" and an ADA exchange diet sheet. His health insurance agency followed up on the diagnosis with a glucometer and test strips. After a year or so of trying to follow the diet plan and test his glucose levels, things appeared to be back in "normal" range, and stood there until a couple of years after my own diagnosis. Shortly...
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