2010 Dietary Guidelines

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Released

June 15, 2010 - The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee has released its 2010 report on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The report consolidates and summarizes dietary research from the last five years and provides nutritional recommendations for the public. For the first time, the DGAC report addressed eating behaviors, such as skipping breakfast, snacking, and eating fast food. The report also made a first-time recommendation that children, adolescents, and overweight or obese adults restrict their intake of sugar-sweetened beverages.

2010 DGAC

 

The guidelines conclude that in order to prevent obesity and chronic disease, Americans should:

  • Minimize “screen time.” There is a well documented connection between spending time sitting in front of the television or computer and obesity. “The strongest association,” notes the report, “is with television screen time.”
  • Eat at home. Home-cooked meals are typically smaller and better balanced; they’re also less likely to contain excess levels of sodium and trans fats. The report notes: “Strong and consistent evidence indicates that children and adults who eat fast food are at increased risk of weight gain, overweight and obesity.”
  • Consume more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Americans get too many of our calories from processed foods. “Efforts are warranted to promote increased intakes of vegetables (especially dark-green vegetables, red-orange vegetables, and cooked dry beans and peas), fruits, and whole grains…among all ages.”
  • Minimize consumption of added sugars, refined grains, and sodium. Both children and adults are over-consuming foods from these groups. “Americans should reduce consumption of calories from solid fats and added sugars; intakes of refined grains are too high. Children and adults should lower their sodium intake as much as possible by consuming fewer processed foods that are high in sodium, and by using little or no salt when preparing or eating foods.”
  • Enjoy more physical activity. As a nation, we need to get moving. Says the report: “People of all body weight classifications gain health and fitness benefits by being habitually physically active. Some physical activity is better than none, and more is better.”


The full text of the Dietary Guidelines is available at the DGAC website.

Last Modified Date: November 28, 2012

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by Nicole Purcell
Over the weekend, I moved my home from Providence to Pawtucket, RI. I really made an effort to purge out as much as I could in the weeks prior to the move so we were able to get everything I own over to my new home in two trips. Very exciting. My new place is gorgeous, just remodeled, wood floors, tile bathroom. Lots of character. Very homey. Now it's just a matter of unpacking my life and organizing the bits and pieces. I have found that the stress...