What I Wish I Had Always Known about Exercise and Diabetes

I have an even longer list of all the things I wish I had known about exercise and diabetes, but let me share just a few more tidbits with you to whet your appetite for more. Exercise is probably the best way to control emotional stress and to stave off depression—far better than antidepressant medications and with no bad side effects! What's more, exercise naturally bestows your body with antioxidant effect, which is why regular exercisers are less likely to develop most types of cancer; why they generally feel and act younger than their chronological age; why they're less likely to even get a cold if doing moderate amounts of regular exercise; and why exercise is about the best medicine that there is for so many other health conditions (so don't forget to take your daily dose). Finally, there are many different ways to exercise, including standing up more, taking extra steps during the day, fidgeting, and just generally being on the move whenever and wherever possible. Knowing that hopefully takes away all of your excuses for not being more active. If you can't get in a "planned" workout on any given day, you can certainly add in more steps or other activity all day long instead (or do it in addition to your usual exercise). Every bit of movement you do during the day counts, so fidget away!

If you need motivation or tips for getting started on an exercise program, check out my book entitled The 7 Step Diabetes Fitness Plan. For people with any type of diabetes who are already more active but want more in-depth information, my latest book released in November 2008, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook, is for you; it's packed with good information for type 1 and type 2 exercisers, along with real-life athlete examples, athlete profiles, and over 100 sports and recreational activities. For inspiration about living long and well with diabetes, consider reading 50 Secrets of the Longest Living People with Diabetes. For all sorts of other tips on exercise, fitness, diabetes, nutrition, and more, please visit my Web site and exercise blog at www.shericolberg.com.

Read Sheri's bio here.

Read more of Sheri Colberg-Och's columns.

NOTE: The information is not intended to be a replacement or substitute for consultation with a qualified medical professional or for professional medical advice related to diabetes or another medical condition. Please contact your physician or medical professional with any questions and concerns about your medical condition.

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Last Modified Date: April 23, 2013

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by Nicole Purcell
I am body dysmorphic. Since my teens, I have had what has been diagnosed as a distorted view of my weight, shape, and size. It is challenging, and it really does make living with diabetes even more difficult. For three days, in spite of no changes in a regimented eating and exercise routine, I have felt gigantic. I can barely look in the mirror because I don't like what I see. I feel as if I have tons of fat beneath my skin, just pulsing against the pores. I feel like...