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Practice makes near perfect at bedtime

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March 30, 2015
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Totes Cray



One of the perks of having a child with type 1 diabetes is that you get to go on just about every school field trip your kid goes on.



Even the ones that leave at 6 in the morning.



And return at about 11 pm.



And include a six-hour long band competition followed by a trip to a theme park.



And require you to be responsible for nine other 12-year-old boys.



I don’t recall seeing any of this on the agenda I was given when I volunteered to be a chaperone.



Board bus that smells of peanut butter and flatulence.



Watch as chaperone hands out bags of chips to kids on bus and Charlie devours before I can even see what’s up with blood sugar.



Sit behind Charlie and pull out Dexcom.



Text Susanne.



"Breakfast appears to be doing a number on him if Dexcom is right. 355 with two arrows up."



Tell Charlie to test.



Text Susanne.



"377 though like 4 units active. Wonder if he’ll start feeling sick. Wonderful start to the day."



"Not good,” Susanne says. “Give it another half hour."



Text Susanne.



"Choir thing is over. Now to high school for band stuff. Sugar came down. Long day already."



"Any parents to talk to?"



"Hanging with Victor but he just dozed off and is snoring in the seat behind me," I text back.



Supervise bolus of Charlie’s lunch.



Overhear another chaperone next to me say, “Why are you so high?” to his son as he negotiates lunchtime boluses for his two insulin-pump wearing kids – a son and a daughter.



Say something stupid to the man like, “type 1 diabetes???”



Tell the man about Charlie and when he was diagnosed, etc.



Pull out Dexcom for the man to see even though he never asked to see it.



Realize I’m like one of those jerks who says to a total stranger, “Hey, come take a look at my new Porsche.” And says “Por-sha” not “Porsh.”



At theme park, stay behind with one kid while the others (including my son) take off up several flights of stairs to ride a rollercoaster.



Realize that I have all of Charlie’s testing supplies and glucose tabs in my possession and if he goes low up there, we’re very much screwed.



Exhale when I see Charlie return.



Wait 40 minutes for counter service dinner.



Glance at Dexcom.



Languish temporarily over Charlie’s request to eat a full order of fries for the first time in his life.



“Please, dad???”



Grant wish.



Send the following photo to Susanne and text, "talk to me."



image-title


"40 for the fries and 12 for the chik."



Let’s see. What’s next up on the agenda?



Have first kid lose drawstring bag with money and iPhone in it.



Search for lost drawstring bag with money and iPhone in it.



Glance at Dexcom.



Have second kid lose drawstring bag with money and iPhone in it.



Glance at Dexcom.



Lose a kid.



“Has anyone seen Mark?!?”



Find kid. Phew!



Glance at Dexcom.



Find first kid’s lost drawstring bag with money and iPhone in it.



Hum “CE-LE-BRATE good times, come on!” in my head.



At the risk of getting yelled at by scary band lady (again), supervise my group as they stop for ice cream despite being way, way late to board the bus.



Go with the flow and hope for the best regarding blood sugar.



Pick up head after looking up carbs on my phone.



“Where’s Mark?!?”



Find Mark. Phew!



Get yelled at by scary band lady for being late.



Board bus that smells of peanut butter and flatulence.



Find second kid’s lost drawstring bag with money and iPhone in it.



Raise both arms in air and hum “no time for losers, cause we are the champions … of the world” in my head.



Sit behind Charlie and pull out Dexcom.



Text Susanne.



"Pretty freakin wiped."

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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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