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July 23, 2014
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Is the Omnipod Working?


After about a month off the Omnipod and using MDIs again, I’d adjusted to the details of the Lantus and Humalog dance. My skin wasn’t chronically itchy and sensitive. My pants didn’t irritate my pod site. And my blood sugars were surprisingly better controlled. I experienced consistently in range numbers compared to the variability of the Omnipod.


Last month, the CDE said something that I know I’ve heard before but it hit a chord. Her own daughter was type 1 and switched between the Omnipod and the t-slim insulin pump for her management. This apparently worked for her as the Omnipod sometimes irritated her and the t-slim offered a few features that she liked. What struck me was when she said that her control varied across multiple pumps.


I know I’ve heard this because a Facebook friend actually did charts over 3 different pumps and her variability in control. She determined which pump worked for her best and tossed out the rest. Omnipod was one that did not work for her. I’ve heard this from multiple pump users. But there are also Omnipod users who absolutely love it and find control to be easy. Cannulas can make all the difference, so is that my issue?


Since last Sunday, I’ve been back on the Omnipod and I’ve already seen some frustrating numbers that irritate me. Some of it is completely my lack of “detail” but some of it is just irksome. Numbers that were steady with the same meal, bolus, and environments on Lantus are in the 300s on Omnipod. I’m not ready to give up on the Omnipod yet as I do want the best control. But I’m frustrated by the significant changes that can occur from one management system to another.


I want to try increasing my basals again on the Omnipod and see if that helps any. Morning highs have been an on-going issue with this pump, as opposed to terrible night lows with the Medtronic. I’m also back on track with lower stress (sort of), increasing exercise, and all the necessities of healthy living. Hopefully everything pulled together will create better averages and diabetes control.


If I don’t see improvement in the next month, I will strongly consider purchasing a different pump or going back on MDIs. I want flexibility and peace of mind but I cannot sacrifice good control and reduced risk for those things. I hate to keep chasing elusive numbers and goals if this management system just won’t work for me.



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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