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November 23, 2014
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This Godforsaken Heat


My Lord, it's hot. Like scorching hot. I'm sure many of you already know this and are living this. Strangely, I've read three different blogs today regarding the impact of heat on bloodugar. And they're all over the map regarding the impacts. Two bloggers wrote about needing a lot more basal insulin, another wrote about nighttime low struggles that just started in the heat. For me, it's the latter. The heat tends to drive my bloodsugars downward. I've cut my basal dose from 19 units to 16 units and that's helped. It's as if my body's sweat is also funneling glucose out of me. I have to admit that I tested this theory last night, tasting just a little of my own sweat. It didn't seem unreasonably sweet. It's tough to explain to people how challenging the heat can be with diabetes. People with working pancreases seem to have a hard time grasping that my body in general seems to have to work harder to stay warm or keep cool and that the extra work is bound to have some impact on my bloodsugar. It's also tough to explain because the experiences of people with diabetes vary so widely. Four different blogs, two different impacts of the heat on bloodsugar. What's a normal person to believe when it comes to us and our diabetes weirdness? Sample conversation: "Man this heat is killing my bloodsugar. ugh." "I know, your sugars must be so hard to keep in line, you must be so high!" "Um, nope, I'm struggling to keep mine up." "But my mother's friend's uncle's cousin has diabetes and the heat makes it high..." "I guess diabetes varies!" "Hm.... Should I text him and ask if it's normal for you to be having lows in this heat? Maybe you need to go to the doctor..." "No, no. It's just that diabetes isn't the same in everyone, it's OK, it's cool." "Maybe you just need to not eat that cake." "Gr." Or something like that. Diabetes variances really make it challenging to understand - let alone explain. This godforsaken heat must stop. It's complicating things!

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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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