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September 22, 2014
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Amazing d-Tech: Technology defined


This morning it wasn’t the sun, the wind, or the birds that woke me up. It was the soft, insistent vibrating of a medical device urging me to check my blood sugar. Opening my eyes, still safely under the covers, I checked my blood sugar with a meter smaller than a deck of cards, calibrated my continuous glucose monitor, and then glanced at my insulin pump — which reminded me that today was the day I needed to change my infusion set.


My dLife is pretty high tech. And I’m not even out of bed yet.


Technology, technology, technology. We’re surrounded by a sea of technology. When our most ancient ancestors picked up sticks to dig for termites, they launched a never-ending revolution. They went on to domesticate fire, convert rocks into tools, and develop written language. What started in caves carried us through to trains, planes, and automobiles, and ultimately launched us into both inner and outer space.


It became human nature to use technology. We’re now not so much homo sapiens, as homo technologsis. And the pace of this innovation has accelerated exponentially with the passage of time. Now with palm-sized wireless computers in our clever monkey hands, we live in a world so embedded in technology that we hardly take notice of the wonders around us.


When most people think about technology, they think of things with computer chips in them. But, oxymoronish as it may sound, I take an old-fashioned view of technology. Technology, to me, isn’t just about computers. It’s so much more. I define technology as using our minds to figure out ways to use things to solve our problems.


And rarely in human history has there been a greater nest of problems to be solved than in fighting diabetes. In response, hundreds… no… thousands upon thousands of technological solutions have been devised to help us not only to cope, but to thrive with our diabetes.


Luckily for me, I’m not the only ape working on the problem. From things as simple and clever as invisible needles, to things as divinely mind-bogglingly complex as cloud server-based computer programs to manage our d-Data and talk to our docs, the ingenuity of a great number of the species homo technologsis has been brought to bear on diabetes.


Please join me each week as we delve into this d-Tech, from the most simple to the most complex. We’ll look at the latest in devices, in medicines, and in trends—all the amazing new tools our species is creating to tame diabetes.



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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