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Practice makes near perfect at bedtime

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October 25, 2014
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Opposite Day


Woohoo!!!! Opposite Day! It’s here! Finally!!!

 

How do you celebrate Opposite Day? Do you wear a bikini on a freezing winter day? Do you eat meat if you’re a vegan? Do you have breakfast for dinner? Dinner for breakfast?  Do you Atheists worship God for the day? Do sheep shear shearers rather than shearers shearing sheep? (Say that three times fast).

 

Opposite Day is awesome!

 

In our house, we like to celebrate Opposite Day by seeing what would happen if we do everything we were taught by medical professionals to do to care for our son who has type 1 diabetes.

 

Step one: After rigorous activity (power skating at ice rink from 8 pm to 9 pm), lower basal rates temporarily for several hours. This is especially important during sleeping hours. You don’t want the little guy to crash in the middle of the night.

 

Step two: Set alarm for midnight. Despite the lowered basals, he’s bound to go low with all the strenuous skating he was doing [wink, wink].

 

Step three: “Hey, Charlie, why are you standing all creepy like at the foot of our bed like some sort of zombie? Shouldn’t you be sleeping?”

 

Step four: Follow son back into his room where he pulls back his blankets like a coroner, revealing a large Africa-shaped imprint of urine on the bed sheet.

 

“Wait a minute …”

 

[looks at date on iPhone]  “Could it be?!?

 

“Already?!? It seems like it was just …”

 

“It is! It is today!”

 

“HAPPY OPPOSITE DAY EVERYONE!!!”

 

“Ooh, I can’t wait to see what we got for Opposite Day!”

 

[snap]

 

[pop]

 

“285?!?”

 

“Ketones?!?”

 

“All night long?!?”

 

“Ha! Ha! That makes no sense at all!!!!”

 

“Oh, Opposite Day. You are full of surprises.”



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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