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October 1, 2014
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Split Changes


I’m rocking a blood sugar of 102 right now yet I expected to see something above the 200 mark on the meter screen. This has happened multiple times lately. I’ll have a headache and feel foggy with a slight thirst or unease in my stomach. All of the tell-tale signs of a high blood sugar, yet not the result on the meter.

 

Don’t get me wrong- I’m not complaining about a 102. That’s perfect to me and I’d love to ride there for the rest of my life. I just don’t want to feel high and clock in normal. I want to feel normal and clock in normal. Maybe it’s because all the numbers minus those killer 40s and 50s are in the upper end of the range for me. So maybe my brain is just expecting more highs since I can’t seem to get it right these last two weeks.

 

There are a lot of changes happening in my life right now. I’m teaching more yoga classes. My stress level is changing directions. I’m experiencing things that I haven’t done ever or in many, many years. All while fine-tuning my Lantus split. I’m feeling a little like the diabetes gods are warring against me, especially with that minor increase in my A1c this time around.

 

I’m still working on the overnight Lantus, which I lowered from 14 units to 13 and then to 12 units. I’ve seen some drastic drops in my blood sugars over the midnight hours though like 172 to 55 or 326 (with a 2 unit bolus) to 55 or even 209 to 144. Given my history with night lows and seizures, overnight numbers are the most important to me. I’m trying to work the Lantus so that I don’t feel forced to start above 200 at midnight in order to make it through the night without a 30. So I’m trying 11 units this week and hoping I don’t royally mess up the other numbers while I’m playing with this.

 

My patterns through the mid-morning, afternoon, and early evening are spot on with what I expect. I see spikes when I’m doing morning yoga routines (because I decrease my breakfast bolus in order to avoid lows) yet ride smooth when I practice or teach in the afternoons. My mid-day Lantus injection is peaking between five to seven hours (normal for me) which shows some quick drops in the late afternoon/early evening. That injection is down from 14 units to 13 and may need to be lowered again.

 

The aspect that I haven’t figured out yet is how to keep my numbers in check while practicing or teaching yoga. Lowering my meal boluses sends me too high, but lowering my Lantus still has me low. Maybe I need to decrease the meal boluses by a little less and keep the Lantus lowered as well. There’s got to be a middle-ground somewhere!

 

My other venture in all this is that I’m trying to track at least some of my meal and correction boluses to see if my sensitivity and insulin ratios are working for me. I think that the insulin to carb ratio works, but the sensitivity may be a little off. I used to track all of these numbers down to the last detail, but my habits changed and now I just can’t seem to be bothered. I know it’s what makes the difference when you get down to these last few 0.3 or 0.4% in the A1c though so I’m trying to change the habit. I should probably get my old logbook out and start tracking it that way again but for now, I think I’ll stick with using my day planner and pressing my memory each day.



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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