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Practice makes near perfect at bedtime

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July 25, 2014
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Making Sense of Technology


 

I've been using my Dexcom sensor for three weeks now with only a couple of days off this week. It seems that my main reason for using it is to catch lows and the occasional extreme high, but I don't feel like I'm using it to the best of my ability. I haven't even uploaded the information...granted, the first week on was my yoga training, second was vacation, and this week is my first yoga teaching classes. So these aren't typical weeks or habits.

 

Still I think having this device means that I should be using it for more than just hypo awareness if I'm going to be plugged in 24/7. Being on MDI's makes me feel like I'm essentially powerless though. If I raise my Lantus by even one unit, I run too low. And it's not really a basal issue anyway.

 

For instance, the Dexcom shows that I spiked to the 200s twice over night but within an hour or two I was back into the 105-110 range. The first spike came after I drank a Coke because I was 116 before going to bed (my goal is 150-175 because of my history of night lows). The second spike came after I ate a few crackers around 5am because I was hovering at 100 and my stomach was upset. Both times I came back to rest at 100 though.

 

I understand that limiting the spikes is ideal. And especially when I'm planning for babies in the next few years. I'm trying my hardest to get comfortable being at 100 and staying there without being consumed by fear. But it's really hard to watch those spikes and drops overnight and wonder what would have happened if I didn't have a Coke or eat crackers. Yes, the Dexcom probably would have woken me up when I dropped to 60 or 70, but what if it didn't? And even if it did, I don't want to be low. Lows suck.

 

This sounds odd but maybe I'm working in the wrong direction- maybe I should lower the Lantus by a unit and raise my boluses? On MDI's it's so difficult to tell what's basal and what's bolus though. Right now, I'm watching the Dexcom show me at 118 with a slightly down arrow. I ate a typical meal (with my usual 6 unit bolus). I started out at 116 and didn't get above 150. I'll wait to see if the 118 levels out but I still don't know what to make of it...is this because I did hours of yoga yesterday? And if so, what do I do on days when I'm not doing that?

 

It's times like these that I wish I was on the pump again. At least then I could easily use temp basals and change my insulin needs when I'm teaching for several hours versus when I'm sitting on the computer all day. I hated the pump though because it felt like I was confined. It felt like prison. MDI's don't suffocate me that way- but they are proving to be difficult in getting things level. I just want to be healthy- why is it so hard to get this right?



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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