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July 31, 2014
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The Wrong Script


Because things were as up-in-the-air as they were, I managed to forget to have my doctor write a prescription for test strips. When my insurance doesn't cover them completely (no out-of-pocket cost), it's usually a non-issue: they are cheaper through Internet pharmacies, and I don't have to worry about my medical insurance approving the amount I need. That said, the Freestyle Promise program does subsidize the Freestyle Lite test strips, and I switched from the Flash to the Lite a few years ago specifically to take advantage of that coverage.

 

So, in light of my 6.4 A1c (how I hate saying it's that high and yes, I know many of you would just about kill to get that number, safely!), I used my PCP's portal to request a prescription for 100/month Freestyle Lite strips and lancets to be sent to the pharmacy my current plan requires me to use. (This happened Friday, before I received the results analysis I wrote about earlier.) On strips that run about $110 the hundred, less whatever discount my plan gave me, less the Freestyle Lite discount ($15 co-pay, up to $50 subsidy/month), I expected the strips to be coming in less than the price I pay mail-order (about $60 per hundred). When I went to pick up the strips, the pharmacist told me that with the secondary insurance (Freestyle Promise program), the cost was lowered from about $65 to about $35 for my script. I paid, went home, and since I needed to open a new vial of strips, opened the box I had just received.

 

It wasn't until I looked at the vial itself that I found the script was filled for Freestyle stips, not Freestyle Lite and there were only 50 strips in the box. I looked further, and found that this is what the doctor on call (not my PCP one of the other doctors at the practice) had written: Freestyle test strips, 50/month.

 

Not only did I not get the correct prescription, it also cost me the equivalent of retail price, less only half what the Freestyle Promise program wouldl have paid under the terms of the offer, for a batch of strips I can't use.

 

I'm only working part-time, at barely over minimum wage, and I'm having difficulty paying for everything in the first place. Making me waste the equivalent of a day's pay for something I can't use, and at rates higher than I pay for what I can use... let's say "extremely annoyed" doesn't begin to describe how I feel about it.

 

I'm not sure if, or how, I can get the issue remediated. I tried to respond via the portal, but have gotten no answer.

 

Just noticed after I got home from the pharmacy: the script was for the WRONG test strip, in insufficient quantity. I require a prescription for the FREESTYLE LITE strips, not the old Freestyle strips. (The Freestyle Promise program is somewhat stubborn about that.) Also, I asked for a script for 100 strips per month, I was only given 50. This amount is insufficient for anybody with any sort of diabetes to properly manage his or her condition -- especially not when the course of therapy is changing. I have just WASTED over $35 for half the amount of strips I should have received for that price, for the wrong strip.

 

I'm not sure what more I could have written, or how to have worded it.

 

Has any of you ever run into this sort of issue? If so, how did you handle it?



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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