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November 27, 2014
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Completely Naked


Using an insulin pump has its advantages. I dont have to carry around syringes with me everywhere I go. It automatically calculates the amount of insulin I need when I enter the amount of carbohydrates I am going to consume. If I get to a restaurant and have to wait 45 minutes to be seated I wont have a low from taking my shot before I get to dinner (which happened several times to me before).

 

With that comes the down sides of insulin pump therapy. The biggest one that comes to mind is having to wear this infusion site on you all the time. And since I do not have an Omnipod, I also have to worry about tubing which can get tangled, caught on things, and just get in the way.

 

Now I am also using the continuous glucose monitor that works with my Minimed pump. That is another piece of equipment that has its ups, (seeing trends of my blood glucose level, hearing alarms when my BG is way out of whack) and its downs (another thing stuck to my body).

 

Now showering can be tricky. I always disconnect my pump and leave it on the counter and luckily the CGM sensor is waterproof but still I have to be careful not to yank either of them out.

 

This morning was a rare treat. Last night my sensor died and was ready for replacement and I had just enough insulin in my pump to get me through the night. I knew when I went to bed what that meant.

 

A completely naked shower! Hooray!

 

I was so happy to be able to pull my site before I got in and not have to worry at all about things stuck to my body. I felt so free and normal. I know that may sound silly to some but those of you that have a pump and a CGMS, back me up here okay?

 

So I guess the message in this post is, be sure and celebrate the little things when you can. Diabetes is such a pain sometimes that you have to applaud those moments when you feel a little more normal.



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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