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September 3, 2014
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Stomach. Eyes. There's Problems When One is Bigger


I had trouble explaining to my endo at my last visit why I don't always bolus prior to eating. So much trouble that I was painfully aware that she didn't have diabetes and didn't understand some of the tiny nuances that come along with this.

 

Lately the main reason I've delayed a bolus is because I don't always know how much I'm going to eat. And it really sucks when you think you're going to eat X number of carbs and then bolus and then wind up not eating that amount.

 

Sure, there are other times when I go into a meal too low to justify bolusing up front, but for the most part it has to do with not really knowing how my stomach will react to what I'm planning to eat.

 

Take today's lunch for example. We had some small rolls left over and I decided to make several small sandwiches with these rolls instead of regular bread. Just wanted to mix things up a bit... and get rid of the rolls that have been sitting on my counter for way too long.

 

I really thought I'd be able to finish all that I had made for myself. Well, you guessed it, I got half-way through and realized that I was definitely done. Most days this wouldn't have been an issue, but I had already bolused for the full amount of sandwiches. I really considered forcing myself to eat the remainder to avoid a low later, but knew that was stupid on several levels.

 

Speaking of stupid: I didn't test before I ate. So I didn't know where I was going into the meal. Which means lots of testing over the next couple hours and lots of wondering if that little twitch or the sudden flush feeling in my face is me going low or if the dreaded fever has finally infected me.

 

On the up side, I have a couple things going for me: I had complex carbs for breakfast that are likely still hanging around in my system and that likely needed another bolus and the rolls were (*gasp*) not whole wheat, which means delayed absorption.

 

So we'll see where the afternoon takes me, but it's been nearly an hour with no negative side effects so I may have escaped the wrath.



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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