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November 26, 2014
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Consequences and Complications


I have not been compliant with my diabetes protocol for several months. I haven't been testing, I haven't been watching what I eat or exercising. I've even been eating straight carb snacks - when I'm supposed to "never eat carbs alone! "

 

I can "get away" with this once in a while because I'm early in Type 2. But today I read a story that pulled me up short.

 

People with diabetes are 15 times more likely to have a lower limb amputation than those without the disease. Yes, FIFTEEN times more likely. And then, 70% of the people who have amputations are dead within 5 years.

 

The article also states that there are over 100 amputations due to diabetes a week in the UK, with a population of 60 million. So I looked at the US government site on diabetes and the figure here was 71,000 amputations due to diabetesin 2004. Or 1350+ a week!

 

One of my oldest friends who had Type 1 diabetes lost a couple toes and was gone within TWO years.

 

I have a lot of online friends with Type 1 and I have minimal effects from my Type 2. So I tend to not take my disease seriously. In it's early stages itfeels not nearly as life threatening as Type 1. Plus there's the whole "I deserve it" factor. Even this article,appparently drawn from a press release fromDiabetes UK, says "Type 1 usually develops in childhood while Type 2 is linked to lifestyle factors like obesity."

 

Every time I read things that intimate that Type 2 is basically a lifestyle choice, I believe I subconsciously think that when I make a different choice, the disease will magically disappear. Itmight be understandableto believe that if I was making those new choices!

 

Once again, I am commiting to getting my act together around this disease. Test at LEAST fasting sugar level, eat better, lose weight, exercise regularly - yada, yada, yada. How about I just start with testing my sugar tomorrow morning?



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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