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Practice makes near perfect at bedtime

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July 29, 2014
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Just the Fax


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CraigPJ

Last week I wrote about my experience with my new endo. Today marks a week from that first visit and the day I am supposed to fax over a weeks worth of BG readings and boluses from my pump.

 

When I left that appointment my doctor said, "I want you to print out the data from your pump with glucose readings and bolus amounts and fax it to my nurse next Tuesday. Be sure and give us which number we can reach you at because I am sure I will have some changes to your pump settings for you to make."

 

Never in my life have I had a doctor do this. They always tell me to make another appointment, and consequently pay another co-payment, to sit down and go over a months worth of numbers. But a week? And a fax? Is this guy for real?

 

I used my Minimed USB link device to pull the reports he wants from the computer. I am a little concerned since with my son's 8th grade graduation and fathers day this last weekend, I know my blood sugars were out of control.

 

Oh well, I bolused for every carb even if it seems like a million carbs! I do not want to lie or fudge the data. I need to get my diabetes under control and the first way I can do that is by being honest about it.

 

I know I am not the only one who guesses horribly at carb amounts only to correct bolus for it later. Surely I am not the only person with diabetes who forgets to check his BG when he goes to bed occasionally. Could I be the only one who never seems to change the lancet in his glucose monitor?

 

No one is perfect at this stuff but the best thing we can do is be upfront, honest, and revealing to our doctors. If they don't know, how can we expect them to help?

 

As simple and logical as that sounds, I still seem to keep some things to myself.

 

But not with this doctor. I am going to tell him the good, bad, and the ugly.



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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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