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December 21, 2014
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Travel Fears


I've been bragging for a few months now that Mom and Dad are flying my family, my brother's family and my single brother to Catalina Island, Calif., in June to celebrate Mom's 60th birthday (which is in August). Having spent quite a bit of time at the beach as a youngster, I simply can't wait to introduce my children to the ocean.
Although the trip isn't until the first week of June, I've already done some preparing. I'm making mental lists of supplies I'll need for the kids, noting which suitcases to take, realizing I need to drop a few pounds, and even (gasp!) deciding to buy a new swim suit since it's been years since I had a new one. (I think I may need to be heavily sedated or severely drunk for that dressing room session!)
I've traveled since I was diagnosed. Before the pump, though, it seemed easy: put the Novolog pen in my purse, five syringes and a Lantus bottle in an insulated lunch bag, my meter and an extra bottle of test strips and I was good to go. I've had a couple of "Oh, sh*t!" moments lately, though, as I think about how traveling with the pump will be different.
I'm not worried about getting through airport security. Heck, I got a breastpump through security in St. Louis and Philadelphia, I'm not worried about my pump. (The look on the x-ray operator's face when I said "breastpump" was priceless!) I'm not even really worried about getting syringes through security. I'm worried about two things: making sure I have all my supplies, and sand in my pump.
First, my supplies are all over the place in my house and office and I'm used to being able to just open a cabinet or drawer and finding what I need. I so take my supplies for granted. I'll need to make a list just to make sure I've got everything! I'll need a separate suitcase just for pump supplies and backup pump supplies. OK not really, but it feels like it.
And then there's the sand and the saltwater. This is what I'm most afraid of. I'll likely leave Toohey in the hotel room and deal with whatever high I may encounter. I guess that depends on how long we're at the beach. Or maybe a waterproof/sandproof carrier for my pump is in order.
And, geez, there's even information floating around that for a nominal fee you can get a loaner pump from MiniMed for travel purposes. And then I think, Oh Hell what happens if my pump completely poops out on me while I'm half-way across the country? (Mental note to bring pump rep's phone number.)
This is going to be like having a fourth kid. Get me a paper bag, I think I'm going to hyperventilate.

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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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