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November 1, 2014
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Traveling Day 1


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I checked, double checked and triple checked the TSA website to make sure I knew every law before I made my flight. I found out diabetics can carry water, juice and all supplies on board the plane. I read all my rights when or if they searched me or my bag.
I packed twice the amount of supplies I would normally use for the next six days. I brought snacks, glucose tabs and an entire bag of life-savers. I had extra batteries, important medical phone numbers and syringes just in case of pump malfunction. I went through security with little hassle. They took my water (which I didnt fight for because I was running late for the flight). They asked what was on my belt and before I finished "insulin" they waved me through the metal detector. No one even asked to inspect my bag or see my prescriptions (after all my research!)
The flight I was late for was delayed getting out because of bad weather so I sat on the middle of the tarmac for two and a half hours (severely postponing lunch). As Im waiting for an update from air traffic control (and the seatbelt sign is on!), I feel my blood sugar dropping. How long can I hold out? Of course my glucose is in the bin above me and no one is allowed to move so I cant even ask the attendant for coke or juice. I wait it out until we get in the air and past the turbulence. The attendant finally brings the drink car (and mini turkey sandwiches) around. The low passes without any trouble.
We land in the tropics where the sun beats down and the ocean rumbles in the background. As I walk off the plane, I just wish that I was leaving my diabetes in the cargo hold. What I would give for a vacation from this disease...simply: everything.

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Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
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