Search
Blogabetes

 

dLife Daily Tips

Practice makes near perfect at bedtime

Read More
April 19, 2014
Category:
Children Complications Emotions Fitness
Food Highs & Lows In the News Insulin & Pumps
Men's Issues Real Life Relationships Type 1
Type 2 Women's Issues Oral Meds Technology

Whammy Wednesday


This morning I woke up to my pump alarm yelling at me. I turned over and looked at the clock. Having over an hour before I needed to wake up I grabbed my pump and pressed the ESC and ACT buttons to kill the alarm and fell quickly back to sleep. I knew this morning was going to be an infusion set change day so I was not surprised, just annoyed.
No sooner did I go back to sleep that I heard the alarm again. Not normally when you clear the low reservoir alarm you have another 10 units of insulin worth before the alarm goes off again. I reached under the blankets and cleared the alarm again. I don't think I even achieved REM state before my alarm went off and I was up for good. Bummer.
I looked down at my pump to check out how much time I had left before I was dry and I realized what the problem was, my battery was low too. A double whammy on Humpday is not the way you want to wake up people. I saw that I had about 5 hours left of insulin in my pump as long as I didn't eat of course so I just went through my typical morning and headed off to work which is where I usually change my sets.
When I get to the office I realized that my supply of AAA batteries that I keep in my bag is depleted. Darn. I ask around to a few employees who look at me funny when I say, "Do you have any batteries on ya?" Is that really such a weird question? Anyhow, I took off to the local gas station to buy some overpriced Duracells. When I asked the gentleman behind the counter for the triple A's he said, "Oh I can't sell those to you because they are the wrong ones." He pulls out a package and says, "You see the Asian writing? This was not supposed to come here so we cannot sell them."
Although I could tell it was a Duracell package, all of the writing was definately not english. Whammy number three!
I asked him to check and see if he has any others back behind the counter and in fact he did. I paid for them and took off to work since now I was late.
When I got back to work I dumped all my supplies on my desk and filled my reservoir with insulin. I grabbed my infusion set and I.V. Prep pad ready to head to the little diabetic boys room when I realized that did not grab my infusion set insertion device. What began as a simple search through my bag became a frantic, "Tell me I did not forget it" moment. Whammy number 4.
There is no way that I can push that infusion set into my leg so I decided to just keep the same site until I get home and I just changed my reservoir. I am sure that is not the best way to handle it but I figure 8 more hours should not be a big deal.
Let's hope tomorrow is whammy free.

Email this

Megan Holmes
Megan Holmes Megan was diagnosed in 2009 with Type I. As an RN, she was familiar with the medical side of her diagnosis; learning to be a good patient on the other hand, was and continues to be the challenge of her day to day life.   (Read More)
Michelle Kowalski
Michelle Kowalski Michelle Kowalski, a writer, editor and photography hobbiest living in Phoenix, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in February 2005. In January 2008, as part of her quest to start on an insulin pump, Michelle learned that she actually has type 1 diabetes.   (Read More)
Our Other Bloggers: Nicole Purcell , Lindsey Guerin , Chris Stocker , Carey Potash , Brenda Bell
  • Add to Google Reader or Homepage