Know why you're high when you arise?

30921e9d-2647-11df-b61e-0017a4aa266a 762839f2-2649-11df-9d36-0017a4aa266a It is not unusual to have a blood glucose number that's higher in the morning than it was when you went to bed. This could be due to:

tip_082.Blood_Glucose

  • the liver making glucose at night and your body producing hormones in the morning that fight the insulin, whether you inject it or make your own.
  • taking too much insulin in the evening. When you go low, your body reacts with hormones to bring it back up.
  • not taking or making enough insulin to cover you through the night.

So what can you do?

  • Understand your body by checking your blood glucose more often, even in the middle of the night to see if you are unusually high or low.
  • Check your food, activity, and stress levels.
  • Learn how your medications work and when they work the hardest.

If you can't figure it out, talk with your health care team, so that together you can come up with a solution for you.

For more information on morning highs, read Somogyi Effect vs. Dawn Phenomenon.

See All Tips.

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Last Modified Date: November 27, 2012

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