What the Tooth Fairy Didn't Tell You (Continued)

 

Inflammation in the mouth increases upper respiratory diseases like pneumonia. Breathing in those bacteria from your mouth when you have gum disease is not good for you.

Inflammation in the mouth worsens both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. In fact, it has been shown that rheumatoid arthritis sufferers are 400% more likely to have periodontal (gum) disease!

It has an effect on snoring and sleep apnea.

As you are likely aware from your own experience, a large portion of the adult population snores. And approximately 10% of the adult population has some form of sleep apnea. The more severe the sleep apnea, the more it inhibits proper sleep. And we've discovered that lack of sleep alters the secretion of a hormone called leptin, increasing your appetite, creating a direct effect on obesity.

One of the emerging areas of research is inflammation and its effects on your total health. We know that gum disease affects 75% of the population of North America. This ranges from slight to severe. The more severe the gum disease is, the greater the level of inflammation.

One hypothesis is that diabetes mellitus is a disease caused by inflammation. There have been over 1,000 articles written since 2005 on the connection between diabetes and your oral health. Go to http://www.pubmed.com and check it out yourself. Check out: http://www.aaosh.org

My Dad's Story

My Dad is now 85 years old, G-d Bless him. Recently, he was told that he has a heart-valve problem. He lives in Florida but has always relied on my advice when it comes to medical issues. When I found out, I flew him up here to see some of my friends who are among the best cardiologists in the world. In an effort to educate myself about the process and the options, I attended a lecture sponsored by the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

I learned about some of the new options for cardiac valve replacement and I received valuable information that will help me guide my father. Most surprisingly, at the lecture I learned something valuable for my patients as well.

Dr. Valentin Fuster an MD and PhD is Director of the Cardiovascular Institute at Mount Sinai. He spoke about some of his team's recent findings. He described the role of "Inflammation" in the formation of deposits (plaque) on the lining of the coronary arteries supplying blood to the heart muscle (coronary artery disease). It is this disease that leads to most heart attacks and strokes and that Americans spend billions of dollars trying to prevent by taking cholesterol-lowering drugs known as "statins" such as Lipitor.

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Last Modified Date: April 22, 2014

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by Nicole Purcell
I had a bad one last night. A scary low bloodsugar that reminded me just how tenuous diabetes makes my existence. I hate those. I hate the feeling that I'm anything less than a strong, capable woman. Diabetes, like a sledge hammer to the knees, has a way of hobbling the confidence I have in my health, strength and well-being. It is both frustrating and disheartening. It's 2:00 am and a good friend called from their third shift job because they needed someone. Just...